Description

Note: Using Intel 900p (SSDPE21D280GASX) and 2x WD Black 6TB 256mb (WD6003FZBX) however parts are not available on PCPP

Everything has been customized to fit in the case, and provide the best thermal performance. GPU replaced all thermal pads and grease, added thermal pads to backplate heatsink and modified IO Plate for better airflow. CPU is de-lidded with Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut, and heatsink is applied with Kryonaut. Includes 2x EK Vardar 3000 RPM fans and 1 exhaust fan that was included with the case (to make it look balanced) Motherboard PCH and VRM's are sinked properly with Minus Pad 8's, All the cables are routed to not block as much airflow as possible.

Temps are recorded after they stabilized running OCCT, First screenshot is while just browsing the web,, second is after 30s stopping the test. It will get quite loud during load tests that is by design (I would rather it get loud and not overheat, than overheat) but during normal operation, fan speeds dont break 1,800RPM and noise is similar to the breeze through an open window. It is inaudible through all headphones. Total max power consumption reported by Kill-A-Watt is around 500W,

Max CPU power usage reported by HWiNFO is 136W Max GPU power usage reported by Nvidia Inspector is 300W typically around 285 during normal use

CPU is set to 5.2Ghz during benchmarking, 5.1Ghz with vcore at 1.479v for normal use to keep noise down GPU is set to +200/+200 Overclock with 112% max power The Titan V is set on a custom fan curve that puts the Fan to 100% at 75C, and it maxes out at that. There is an additional temperature probe that measures the back IO temp and adjusts the case fan accordingly. It never reaches higher than 77C. The CPU never reaches above 80C

Note: While running prime benchmarks, the CPU will blue-screen at 5.2Ghz after about 45 seconds, I did try modifying the voltages up to 1.55, and was unable to make it stable, however even at those voltages, the temperature never reached above 92C, The fan/heatsink combo is more than capable of dissipating a lot of heat at the expense of excessive noise.

Keep in mind that to me, it was critical to have as much fast HDD storage as possible, that is the reason behind the RAID 0 setup and the case choice. Every smaller SFF case does not allow you to fit 1 3.5" drive, let alone finding the place to jam a second.

http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/8356709 https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/26204979

https://imgur.com/a/dogq2

Total Cost: $5,481.83 with Shipping + CA Sales Tax (where applicable)

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Comments

  • 25 months ago
  • 9 points

i7 8700k @5.2ghz, are u serious bro? with that cooler

  • 25 months ago
  • 3 points

I love how the titan is over half of your build cost.

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

Total cost, with all the right parts, including shipping and tax came out to $5,481.83

The prices PCPP reports are a close estimate, but not accurate

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Benchmarks? ;)

  • 25 months ago
  • 3 points

at least post a picture of the titan v inside the build

  • 25 months ago
  • 3 points

I would love to, but that requires taking half the thing apart again. You can just barely see it poking through from the back side.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

i don't understand, how is it that the titan v is a single slot?

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

It's not, the second slot on the IO Plate is cut out entirely for better airflow.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

OH

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

The absolute madman.

Great job!

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

I'll second that :) Madness indeed!

Have a small build, too but I am not planing on OCing my i7 8700k at the moment. 70C at full load feels a lot more comfortable to me than 100+C :) and have no need for extra performance as running all games at 1440p on ultra

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

My new favorite build. (+1) It's an achievement in itself fitting a Titan V in a case this small, especially with it looking so clean. This definitely deserves a feature.

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

The most difficult was fitting both HDD's in, trying to finagle the wires around I did break the Sata connector off one of the drives, but it still works fine.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Sounds like something I would do, with a response I would make. Just wondering, but what do you use this build for? (Other than minesweeper.)

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

I intend for it to be my primary and only PC for the next 10 years. About 60% of my time is spent gaming, only RTS/TBS games typically, most demanding would be things like Elite Dangerous. The rest of the time is spent coding, networking and just expanding my PC using experience. My current PC, an i7-975 and GTX 480 lasted just over 8 Years, and was nowhere near as powerful as this PC for it's time, so, nearing the 10 year mark this pc will be just as much of a paperweight, but I will still use it until it literally explodes. This PC was my personal challenge build to fit literally as much power as I could into as small and as portable as possible, and I think I succeeded in that.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

What is the Titan V like for gaming?

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

Just add more description and some of the technical performances and this could be a feature. I'd really like to know the temps.

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

The Titan V is set on a custom fan curve that puts the Fan to 100% at 75C, and it maxes out at that. There is an additional temperature probe that measures the back IO temp and adjusts the case fan accordingly. It never reaches higher than 77C. The CPU never reaches above 80C

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

The balls it must take to run a 5.2 GHz OC with a low profile air cooler in a mini ITX case o_o dare i ask what your stress test #s look like?

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

It crashes after about 30s, not because of thermal runaway, but because of total power consumption, I made a note for more details.

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

I spy with my little eye something beginning with "F"

GG on getting featured!

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

Plus 100 points for the Titan V!

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Love the build, love the ingenuity, and I love the creativity. But I have to ask why you got the V? Are you doing neural networking or anything super awesome? haha!

  • 25 months ago
  • 3 points

The GV100 is the top of the line Volta chip, and will likely continue to be the top of the line Volta chip through this architecture, With the latest news that tensor cores will be used to accelerate RTX in the upcoming DX versions it is future-proof into next year. Considering Nvidia just released the Quadro GV100 for $8,000, that uses the exact same chip with more memory should say that there is not going to be another higher performing GV chip until the next architecture. This PC is intended to last me another 10 years. I will squeeze every last frame out of it until it explodes.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

That is awesome! I hope it last you that many years and then some!

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you! <3 I got just over 8 years out of my gtx 480/i7-975 but it couldnt keep up with new games.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Ah that is incredible! I am hoping to get a lot of years out of my current rig!

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

"GPU Core Clock Rate - 5.2GHz"

So how much actual GPU clock?

  • 25 months ago
  • 0 points

I edited that info, I thought they all said CPU, but the clock is reported in the Userbenchmark. 2107 Core is typical for short bursts, while gaming it is around 2025-1995-1987 for a full realistic load. as low as 1855 for synthetic loads. The overclock setting in Precision X is 112% power, 89c, +200, +200

I found that limiting the power to 112% encourages it to use less power and sustain higher clocks for longer because in Nvidia's GPU boost algorithm doesnt seem to like going far beyond the TDP for sustained loads.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh my god setting the Titan V on the staticy bed almost gave me a heart attack. Over carpet! * shivers *

Nice build, welcome to the exclusive Titan V no life enthusiast gamer club!

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Nah fam, its all good. my bed is grounded (as in: its on the ground) Step 1 was: Remove Anti-static Wrist strap and toss it in the bin, right?

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

...

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Why did you have to cover up all the beauty of the Titan V, c'mon man!

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Use Celsius like a normal person :p

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

How are you liking your Optane 900P? I'm considering one for my own build to test with compiling, swap, and have a few other ideas... curious what you're using it for beyond as a boot drive.

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

It's pretty stupidly fast. One thing I've noticed while using 7zip to compress large archives that require more than 32GB of ram, once it starts to overflow into swap space, it doesnt slow down to a crawl nearly as much as using other SSDs. It still slows down to a consistent chug, but it doesn't inevitably stop.

One thing to note is that it is about 1/4 inch too thick for traditional 2.5" drives, If you look at the pictures you'll see I had to break the tabs off to fit it, and the included M.2-U.2 card/cable combo is not that long, especially not long enough for good cable management in a Full or even Half ATX case.

Speed is great, but probably overkill for most people, even the HDD's in Raid 0 are probably overkill, once you break the 1gbps barrier, differences become pretty minor, but for the price, I think it is justified. I hate large SSDs, I always prefer large Raid arrays with traditional disks, and try to stay away from SSD's larger than 120GB, simply because sizes larger than that are overkill for a boot drive. Considering comparable drives cost around the same price for twice the capacity, really isnt a bonus to me in any way, and I'd always choose more speed over more capacity.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

What was the clearance like with the cpu cooler/ram combo?

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

It wasn't possible with the heatspreaders on. I could have gotten slower ram without heat spreaders, but I'm used to removing them, so I just removed them.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Is there a performance difference? I'm thinking of doing the same combo but Ive never removed heat spreaders before.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

None at all, it takes a lot for RAM to overheat, and DDR4 is highly unlikely to need heat spreaders, with good airflow you wont ever see them overheat. Today heat-spreaders are used for aesthetics. To remove them I use varying sized guitar picks and wedge them between the chips until the thing is loose enough to twist off. The tape they use to hold them on is incredibly strong and cannot be peeled off traditionally. You might want to try squirting Goo-Gone between while working them off. You'll notice that the manufacturer will mark chips that are under-performing with an X, at least that's what I've seen from G.Skill. You can also try heating them, which might also help. If you use Goo-Gone be sure to wash and dry in 91% isopropyl or denatured alcohol to remove the residue especially trapped in the BGA. Go to Guitar Center and pick up a variety pack of guitar picks and you'll have every thickness you could imagine.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh awesome! I got a few guitar picks lying around so should be easy. Would the heat spreader removing process be any different for these sticks?

https://au.pcpartpicker.com/product/dMjWGX/gskill-tridentz-rgb-series-32gb-2-x-16gb-ddr4-3600-memory-f4-3600c17d-32gtzr

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Not much different, I assume the plastic bit on the top is only a diffuser/lightpipe for LED's mounted to the leading edge of the pcb, if removed the led's might look terrible un-diffused. I would get non RGB, or turn it off if at all possible. Last ditch effort would be to cover the top edge of the ram with electrical tape to turn the lights off for good. Make a decision BEFORE you assemble everything because removing the cooler is only possible with the motherboard out of the case or with a large back access hole, which might be needed to remove the ram.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

dang I got the 8700 non k with the same cooler bc I thought that it wouldn't be able to handle the 8700k. at least now that I saved $60 getting the non k, its a little slower but it runs way cooler and quieter.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build you got there! What brand of thermal pads and pad thickness did you use to replace the OEM Titan V pads?

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

Minus Pad 8's 1mm, With those new graphite pads, maybe if you are really crazy about thermal performance, cut up some of those.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello mate, 8 months after, how did the titan V go, in terms of temperatures? Was it still okay? What are you min/max/ave during loads?

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Things are going fine. With RTX now out to try I've been experimenting more thoroughly with overclocking and have achieved stable clocks at +186 +190 which benchmarked a Passmark Gpu score of 21221 and a Superposition score of 13160 4K. Temps are around 75 max but I run v sync while playing games to limit gpu usage so typical temps are around 55 and a min of 34 at no load.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

5.2ghz with air cooling is pretty brave

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  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Believe it or not, that's what the motherboard set automatically, and after playing with it for a few hours, I determined that, its the most stable, and easiest to remember, so I better leave well enough alone. I ran a 7700K at 1.450 for over a year in a server, and it still works just fine. I will likely go back and adjust all the voltages manually because 1.479 is stupidly high, but it will likely take a few days of tinkering, and currently it is stable.