Description

Introduction

Hello, everybody! Well, after years of dutiful service, my desktop - the Alienware X51 R2, went belly up. So, it was time for a new build, and this guide is about Pegaship. I have this weird obsession with naming everything in my life sigh.

I built it about a month ago now, but only recently handled cable management and properly put it on my desk. I still have to install an SSD and an HDD, but those aren't critical, so I will get to them eventually. The purpose of this build is software engineering, but also a lot of photography (think around 7TB of photos), video editing, as well as some graphic design and things like that. I want to get into CAD, hence my Quadro card. I also game a lot...gets called off-screen Wait, what do you mean Minesweeper doesn't count? Well I also play Solitai....still no? Fine. Yeah in all seriousness I don't game. :)

CPU

A good amount of cores (which Lightroom will ignore, because thanks Adobe), good speeds and the chance of overclocking it later made this an easy choice. I still don't know how I feel about AMD. Yes, the Ryzen CPUs are great and they have less issues with Meltdown and Spectre, but I'm not entirely sold on them just because I've been with Intel for ages (well all of us have). I may ease into the new CPUs with my new builds!

CPU Cooler

Aside from the fan speeds, idling temperatures, dimensions and mounting, the v1 and v2 H100i are identical. The newer one is cheaper, so I went with that. I am considering making a custom cooling loop way down the line though.

Motherboard

I originally decided on one of the Gigabyte boards and it did not have Wi-Fi. Upgraded to this one after a friend (thanks, Arthur!) pointed it out (my plan was to get a separate card for that, but this is much cleaner after all). Not sure I love the LEDs on it though (see my issues at the end), but otherwise - it's a great board with a lot of overclocking options. I know this is not recent by any means, but using a mouse in the BIOS settings still blows my mind.

Memory

This was actually a downgrade from the 64GB configuration I wanted, but I'll add the other 32GB later. It's memory, it works. I did, however, pay a bit of a premium for the 3200MHz speed.

Storage

Well I pulled the SSD from my Alienware, and that's going to be used as my scratch disc for all things Adobe. Naturally, the M.2 is the primary device. The HDD has my old projects and it'll be good to have a separate location for long-term storage. I have an external WD RED used for Lightroom catalogs and the like. With storage, much like with coffee, you can never have too much eye twitch.

Video Card

As mentioned before, I don't game, and the prices for the GTX cards are only now starting to come down. Given my use cases and the market, I was able to save a bunch of money since I got a workstation-ready graphics card for almost half the inflated cost of a 1080Ti (I'm talking around the time the 1080s went for more than a grand). Long-term goal is to either upgrade to the next level of Quadro cards or to put another P4000 in.

Case

I'm a big fan of Fractal Design's work - minimal cases, brushed aluminum, the tempered glass window is a nice touch. Initially, I bought the R5 equivalent of my current case, but ended up using that for another build. The R6 has a PSU shroud - it's really nice, everything looks clean. I would like them to install some more holes for cable management though.

Power Supply

Well I got a full modular one because it's easier to manage all of the cables. I am a big fan of the EVGA SuperNOVA series and so this was an easy choice as well.

Other

I got custom cables! They are blue. They cable. Yes.

Issues

There were some annoyances that took place during the build. For one, I do like the pump placement up front, but my preference was to have it on the bottom to adjust how the cooling pipes are positioned. The pipes were just 1-2cm too short for this though. The case is missing a couple of cable holes below the motherboard, so the front-panel audio, USB, HDD LEDs, power switch cables stick out more than they should. The open layout is nice, but I'm struggling to see where to put an HDD. I think there is a way to put it in the front (think SSD gutter) since I took the drive array down. Finally, the RGBs are impossible to turn off. I want them on when the desktop is on, but they keep flashing a rainbow spectrum while the system is shut down. I've disabled the necessary power settings in the BIOS to no avail. I may just say "screw it" and shut them down all-together. Buy RGB, they said, easy to turn them off, they said...

Thanks for reading, let me know if you have any questions! :D

Comments

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice photos and build!

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you kindly! :D

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build and photography! I had a couple of the same issues - the lighting and HDD - as I also have an Asus motherboard and fractal R6 case

Lighting I replied above. For the HDD, there are two spots on the panel when you go to the open air layout that you can mount an HDD - technically only for 3.5” drives, though I did jury rig one of the drive sleds with a 2.5” drive to fit in one spot and my 3.5” in the other, using the hardware and grommets that come with the case. I have some photos of it I’m uploading in a day or two - hopefully will give some ideas for you

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd love to see them - thanks for that!

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Beautiful machine! But to control the LEDs, you have to install the Asus Aura software. Once that's installed, there are separate "tabs" along the top that control what the LEDs do when the machine is off or on. The mini-PC I built my girlfriend has RGB stuff and that's how I know this. She sets the LEDs to a dim glow when the machine's off and it asks as a nightlight!

Hope this helps.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Did you have any issues installing the motherboard in this case? I have an Asus Maximus X Hero and Define R6 case. I tried to install it but the IO panel won't fully go in the opening behind the case. Its slightly off, so as a result the screws are not aligned. Tried applying some pressure, different angles, still won't go in. Any help would be appreciated it!

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry about the late reply! I didn't have any issues - the IO shield/panel fit quite nicely. Maybe try seeing if you have any screw supports that weren't removed? Honestly tilting the board IO side first to click it in place and then lowering it onto the screw mounts is what does it.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

CAD = Computer Aided Design

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Meltdown and Spectre are back door vulnerabilities that only affect Intel cpus

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

AMD has their own variants, though. Granted, not as severe or as many though.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah see I did the BIOS thing already :P I will be testing the AURA suggestion from the other comment tonight to see if it works.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I had the same issue with the lighting on my Asus motherboard and finally got around to doing something about it.

Run Asus Aura, then click the “Independent” tab. Choose “static” under the Power Off heading, then make sure the color selector is on black. The lighting on my motherboard now stays off after shutting down the computer.

It’s a terrible user interface and completely non-intuitive. Took me a while to figure out, even with the help of google.

I’m going to update my build with pictures in the next day or two, including a pic of the Aura program, if that helps

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey ya! So, I already had that. Funny enough, when I hit "Apply", the settings just reset. What worked for me was going into Power Options, changing what the power buttons do and disabling "fast bootup". No I have no LEDs when the desktop is turned off - yay :P