Description

I was using my Raspberry Pi for quite some time as a file server for backups, git repo, torrenting and media sharing. I was getting bored of the speeds, so in summary of my change I've gone from 1-2MB/s to ~12MB/s. I'm very pleased that there is no more bottlenecks and I can pleasantly stream, remotely and locally, whatever I want.

My cabling is messy, however sufficient air flow travels through the middle of the case and out to the exhaust perfectly. All the cables are only messy down the side, where there is no requirement for a clear pathway. When I stick another (or few) hard drives in there, I will have to sort it out. However, for now with just two drives installed on one side, it's perfect. I'm only using one of the front fans as a result of this.

The case: I went with this one for obvious reasons. It is really popular among ITX builds, due to its elegant and simple look. It's a very solid build and does not feel cheap at all. I've seen people moan about the power button, but I see no issue with it. I only referred to the manual it for the PSU, but it provided a huge amount of ambiguity. The case itself is very quiet, on low settings you can hardly hear it from over ~1m away. Even low settings keeps the CPU @ ~25c.

The CPU: I was originally going to have the i3 4130, but I'm so glad I didn't and I chose this one. Not only price, but performance. I think in further hindsight, the AMD A6 6400 and the ASRock FM2A78M-ITX+ would have been a far better deal because the Intel currently in there is definitely overpowered for what it's currently being used for. Although, when I graduate it will leave extra power for when I want to take my home networking more serious.

The mobo: the cheapest 6x SATAIII and USB 3.0 mobo out there, and just so happens to be very popular. So this one was a no brainer. Its BIOS is feature rich with a nice UI. It also comes with a RAID controller, which I'm dubious of using as a friend of mine warned me of the "write hole", so that will be a nice learning curve I'm sure.

Storage: The SSD was such an impulse buy when I walked into Novatech. I keep this in my room you see, and I hated the noise of spinning disks with the Raspberry Pi whilst I was in bed. So I thought I'd get an SSD too :-P oh and the HDD came from my PC, as that also has an SSD in it too.

The RAM: cheap and cheerful. I'm only running Ubuntu Server with no DE, so after my packages are installed I'm left with ~900-700MB. I will upgrade in due course when I need to.

PSU: Cheapest semi modular, of the lowest wattage, that was also very popular. This PSU is very quiet. I was tempted to fork out for fanless, but I'm glad I didn't because I really cannot hear this.

I don't really know what else to write...

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Comments

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

damn you just beat me to it. i've build the same one a week ago, the only different thing is the ram. i'm glad people realise the pentium g3420 is a VERY good cpu for it's money. it's 3x times more powerful than my old core 2 duo 2,4ghz, it's ridiculous for 60 bucks.

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build. What are you using for handling media? I'd suggest using Plex as Devianter is using as it is quite simple and convenient to use. +1 on the build.

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. I'm half way through configuring Plex now, actually :-)

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh btw, since we have identical systems.. I wanted to ask you something. Is your cx430m making kinda too much noise? it seems in my setup it's the noisiest component. I can hear it pretty well at night, during the day not so much. Seems like a rattling noise, it's not that big of a deal but it's not that small of a deal to forget about too :) Or may be i'm hearing something else? Seems like the psu...

EDIT

Nah, nevermind, it's the caviar black. ******* that thing is noisy...

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

:-)

Are you using Windows, or Linux for Plex btw?

EDIT: In Linux you can use a utility called hdparm to specify after how many minutes the HDD to fall asleep of non-activity. In Windows, you can control it in Power Management.

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

i'm on windows. my girlfriend uses it as well sometimes and ... well, you understand. it's my startup disk and qbittorrent is 24/7 so it will never go to sleep. the greens vibrate less, but still. kinda starting to think about the ssd all over again.... :)

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Well the Greens would vibrate less as they're 5400rpm! See if you can find some software that slows the RPM or something :-) SSD is worth it, but if you've got discs constantly spinning as you're seeding a lot then it wouldn't make a difference in terms of noise, because you wouldn't really have a 1TB SSD (though if you have the budget, why not!). Though of course, the speed is so worth it :-P

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

yeah i actually have ssd in every computer i own. except this one :) i have 2 greens and they vibrate A LOT LESS, but i seed from wd black as well (the greens are full, and since the black is 1tb, i can't use it JUST as a star up disk. i mean, there are 900 free gigabytes that beg me to fill 'em with tasty stuff :D i guess in the future i'll put the 1+2tb greens on the shelf as a backup in case **** happens, and buy a new 4tb red or something and a ssd. that way, i'll have my collection (3tb, just like the 2+1 greens are now) and 1 tb free for future stuff and the ssd just for startup. i'd love to buy a couple of 3TB reds, but damn them disks are pricey. let's hope with 5tbs knocking on the door the 3 and 4 will drop in price huh