Description

This is a challenge build me and my friends did together in order to get the most value out of an $850 budget while at the same time looking for ways to go as below that as much as possible without sacrificing too much in usage since they wanted to make sure I could use this computer to do a lot of gaming among other things. We were ultimately satisfied with the end result however we are more than willing to take critique and observations on how to improve on the build. Also if curious about the temperatures its due to me being Florida. Would probably run cooler in a cooler climate.

Am still still stress testing the build and its parts so will post reviews on the various parts probably within a month or so maybe.

Keep in mind these three criteria though: 1: The computer build can not go over $850 2: always strive to go as below the budget as possible 3: I forget but something about bundles being best friend and if done right can get all parts same day.

Edit: Forgot to mention that at the time with various discounts and shopping around the end total was around $755. Also ended up with two free games (Devil May Cry 5 and the remake of Resident Evil 2) due to the timing of when the parts were bought.

Second Edit: Forgot to mention that the delivery costs need to be figured in as well not just parts price. Everything ordered on this build was free shipping and all arrived on the same day.

Comments

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

This doesnt seem like the Deepcool TESSERACT

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

When you are on budget you need to establish some serious priorities and ask yourself why you need this pc... For productivity? Gaming? Or something else? I like most of the parts you have chosen but it feels like you got'em randomly, without thinking this trough. I am not trying to be Simon Cowell here, so take this as a simple friendly advice for future builds. Overall, it does packs a punch. So may it serve you well. Cheers.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Okay so read through the comment section and stuff so should at least make a vague defence for myself on this.

I don't know how to overclock computers and honestly don't have the money to replace components just in case I mess up (have heard too many horror stories on messing up on overclocks). As for the critique on the ram it wasn't actually my first choice (can't remember what it was) but the place I was going to get my first choice decided to try and charge me extra for shipping which would of negated any savings and would of put me over budget (about 60% of my original first choice parts would of caused this).

As for the motherboard I wanted something with wireless and bluetooth due to my current living situation but was again limited by money on what I can get. Yes I also know the power supply is overkill but would rather have overkill then something that is underpowered (also can use it in future builds due to its wires being modular.

The liquid cooler was chosen because got it off a friend brand new for $20 and the cooling paste was given as well. The stock cooler went into a different friend's computer because they needed a new one due to their cooler dying.

I already have an SSD the 2 terrabyte is literally so I have more space to install some rather large games.

Got the Strix for $120 at the time when I ordered the parts. It is a tesseract case and the reason why the stuffed animals are on it is due to me needing a new desk (and space for new desk).

I freely admit my cable management is nonexistent and needs to be worked on. Will do that when have more time (and can remember where I left the zip ties). Also would like to admit this is only my second computer build so am still learning.

Still thanks for all the comments and suggestions so far! Will take them as a learning experience when I build another computer and use them to help plan out what I want. (Also do agree about the fans thing but a friend kept insisting so went with it)

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

@Scurn

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  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I like your build a lot, but I wish Intel made the i5 8400 more competitively priced. The Ryzen 2600 may have a MSRP of $200 as well, but it has sat around $145-165 bucks for about a year now. The slight edge the i5 8400 may have with that single-core clock speed is offset by the $50 buck difference between the two in my opinion. Still though, for strictly gaming and fitting the budget you hit the nail on the head. Nice work.

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  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

hello 911 I've witnessed a murder

seriously though, good, albeit firm, feedback. I concur.

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah there's really nothing else to add lol. Good job. I would only disagree with your third point.

They could easily buy a 3rd gen Ryzen CPU to upgrade in a year or two if they find the 1600 isn't cutting it. It would be the next upgrade that would require replacing the motherboard.

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

I agree with a lot, but I'd like to counter some of your points. I have a similarly priced build, albeit I spent months watching sales.

If he bought any reasonably sized SSD, a good chunk of that money you believe he needed to save on the cooler, 'board, and power supply would've been negated. Hard drives are ancient tech', yep, but in extremely limited budgets I see no problem with using them. A computer without an SSD is not useless; let's not kid ourselves here because we've become so used to faster boot times, transfers, and load times. Besides, someone with this budget is not a power user. A SSD is about quality of life, but doesn't give many real-world, tangible benefits for basic users. Emphasis on 'basic user' here.

Money could have been saved on the motherboard for sure, but it's not some crazy idea for him to leave himself with an upgrade path. A comparably priced 3600 will likely end up being 25% faster than his 1600. Tossing $175 bucks or so towards an upgrade a year down the line isn't a stretch and I've known far too many people who have had problems arise from going with a dirt-cheap motherboard. Exhibit A, you believe he needs to overclock his RAM or should have bought a faster kit in the first place. I agree, but good luck reaching a decent overclock on some $60-70 dollar piece of trash 'board.

His RX 570 may not have been the price that's shown here. I've seen them drop all the time and while I agree at that price it'd be an awful deal, there's no denying the RX 570 is the budget king right now. Many of them are going as cheap as $125 bucks lately.

I don't know what your experiences are or where your sources came from, but ambient temperatures absolutely do have an impact on system temps. It may not be a game changer or as noticeable with closed-loop coolers, but the difference is observable. My 570 will fluctuate 5c within a matter of minutes while gaming once my air conditioning in the house kicks on. I am not exaggerating.

The wattage on his power supply is overkill, but the efficiency standard is not. No need to calculate money saved on the power bill; I think a stronger argument could be made against using cheaper power supplies simply because they have lower quality components and higher chance of failure. There's a reason why you hear so many doomsday stories and negative reviews on budget PSU units. If you want your rig to last at least 4-5 years, I would never comfortably recommend picking up a PSU that's less than $40-50 bucks.

That's my take on everything. I absolutely agree with you on the closed-loop cooler and getting faster RAM, though. Also, some food for thought, that case does not look like the Tesseract but I'd wager stacking stuffed animals on the top exhaust (if it even has one, the actual Tesseract does) is not ideal for temperatures. Just a hunch. ;D

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

RE: overclocking the RAM

That kit has the following specs:

DDR4 2400 (PC4 19200) Timing 15-15-15-35 CAS Latency 15 Voltage 1.2V

Most DDR4 3000 kits have specs like these:

DDR4 3000 (PC4 24000) Timing 16-18-18 CAS Latency 16 Voltage 1.35V

Note the timing, latency, and voltage differences.

Of course there is room to overclock this kit on a $70 mobo.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I hear you, but my impression is the OP was referring to extensive clocks well beyond 3000mhz. He claimed Ryzen 'needs' 3000mhz+ which I don't necessarily disagree with, but yeah, how much more is a gray area.

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  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Cool story bro

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

For sure, I think 2800-3200mhz offers the best bang for your buck. For a Ryzen based system, at least.

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  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd like to think mine was better value than the list you have linked.

but... that's not the point.

OP is proud of his build. Let him be proud of his build. Sure... Mistakes were made, but... it's going to be better than most prebuilts at that price point.

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