Description

Another iteration of my previous build. SFF life = always changing cases. I needed to downsize and recoup some money so I decided to sell my M1 and some other items. I also plan to sell the GPU and get a cheaper one at some point because I'm not gaming as much any more.

If I'm being honest I had some buyer's remorse from the M1, particularly the tempered glass side panel. A 240mm AIO with the regular panel or a beefier air cooler is ideal but I couldn't justify spending any more money on upgrades just for some better temps. So I downsized again.

The SG13 has gotten a lot of praise from SFF builders and I can see why: very small and compact, no frills, cheap, and good compatibility. The build quality is better than I thought it was going to be as well. What bugs me is the front I/O and all the cables that have to be routed under the radiator to fit in the case (it makes a mess). My least favorite thing about the case is cable management options, as it was difficult to assemble and make everything cleaner at times. At least now I can transport my rig easily without worrying about damaging anything.

I was a little worried about switching over to liquid cooling for the first time but after setting it all up while I waited for the case in the mail, I'm a believer. At idle the PC is dead silent, can't hear anything unless I put my ear next to the PC (still playing with the fan curves). Under load it gets a little louder but mostly because the GPU fans start spinning. The fan included with the AIO is amazingly quiet. Overall, I'm impressed.

Ambient temperature was about 20 C during a 20 minute test of Witcher 3 at max settings. Note that I have not overclocked anything and the GPU is at stock power levels. Here are the temps:

Open air

  • CPU idle: 30 C
  • CPU load: 49 C
  • GPU idle: 35 C
  • GPU load: 71 C

In the case

  • CPU idle: 33 C
  • CPU load: 59 C max, 56 C average
  • GPU idle: 42 C
  • GPU load: 73 C max, 72 C average

Between this build and my previous one I changed a few things. I built another keyboard, changed up my current one, and got a pair of Sennheiser PC37X. I'm loving the sound quality, probably the best money I've spent in a while!

In the future I plan to mod this case a bit, like painting the front I/O ports and logo so they don't stand out as much. Might use 3D printer to make a new mesh front panel as well.

List of peripherals

  • Dell S2716DGR
  • Logitech G703
  • Custom mechanical keyboards (Anne Pro on the shelf)
  • Sennheiser PC37X
  • Some photos taken with Canon 5D 50mm and 24-105mm

Comments

  • 10 months ago
  • 3 points

Easily one of the best build names I've seen in a while. It goes right up there with

RGB HELL

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Those are some goooood CPU temps! Do ya plan on OCing it a bit? Great build!

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I might at some point but for now I'll keep it as is

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

I love the name.

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Niiiiice temps! And these keyboards _

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Don't know what it is but the pic of your desk setup makes me feel like it is a miniature model.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Could be the lens on the camera

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm sure it is, but the effect is fun.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

This build was the main inspiration for my own. Absolutely love it. Cheers!

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!!

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

i see fellow sg13 user i hit like.. nice build

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

I used an app called Classic Shell, highly recommended. And yes I built both keyboards

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Classic Shell can change a lot of different appearances on windows. I cleaned up the start menu as well using it. Check out TaeKeyboards on YouTube, should help you get a good idea of building keyboards. The ones I made cost about $150 each but they're exactly how I want them. Its pretty easy to do, might require some soldering depending what kind of PCB you get but other then that as long as you follow a guide then you should be good to go. Most kits or parts are only for tenkeyless or smaller size keyboards, but if you want a full size and still get customization look at the GMMK keyboard

[comment deleted by staff]