Description

This system was built to handle photo editing in Photoshop and Lightroom. No gaming :O

My parts choices for this system drew heavily on the excellent information available from Puget Systems, who do extensive testing with all sorts of hardware across a wide range of applications.

Photoshop and Lightroom don't take full advantage of high core count CPUs, preferring fewer faster cores. The i5-8400 (6 cores, 6 threads, 3.8GHz all-core Turbo) seemed to offer the best balance of price to performance.

If you can stomach all the numbers, take a look at the spreadsheet in the build album for a comparison. Do note, Puget Systems' test machines rock a 1080 Ti, a 960 Pro, and 64GB of RAM, which makes it not a fair fight for this system! Still, the differences are rarely more than a few seconds, so, go little -8400 :-)

These image-editing programs don't make great use of graphics cards. The performance difference between a GTX 1050 and a 1080 is minimal - about 10% - while the price difference there is huuuuuuge, and since gaming was not a requirement here, I went with the GTX 1050. MSI's Aero model is cute ;-)

As for the rest of the system:

The main attraction of this budget-range B360 motherboard is four DIMM slots, for an easy RAM upgrade in future, though the two m.2 slots are nice to have as well, and mean there's scope to upgrade storage with m.2 SSDs in future.

Speaking of SSDs, this one is a top-notch SATA III model, with enough space for the OS, essential programs, and project files. There's also 2TB of HDD space for cold storage.

The power supply is a good-quality but no-frills TX model from Corsair. I like these a lot, and 550W is more than enough.

The case was chosen mainly for its 5.25" drive bay (increasingly a rarity). The only issue that arose building this system in it was that things got pretty crowded with the SSD, HDD and ODD all stacked atop each other, making the cable management up there a bit of a pain.

Last thing: the RAM is actually white, though I couldn't find that model in the PCPP lists. It really gives this otherwise sober system a bit of pop!

OK, that's it for this one: hope you enjoyed, and thanks for reading, from Sensible Systems.

Comments

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build and nice description! It’s interesting to see how people use their computers and I really enjoyed reading your description.

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

Glad you enjoyed the write up, and thank you very much :-)

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Very nice build, great wire managment in the case, and very clean! Great Job!

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey, thanks, appreciate it!

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice! I just built a very very similar build for video editing. I like your choice of RAM, and I hope your build suits you well!

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

I saw your build just before starting this one and really liked it, hope it's all going well for you too :-)

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Wow somehow even the stock cooler matches your color theme. I bet that's a first :P

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Ha, yes, that thing does tend to stick out a bit most of the time. I once tried to drown it out with even more blue :D

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Very good build! I will get some "advice" from your build and description to make one for a friend of mine! Thank you, i gave u a like on your fb page! :D

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you very much, cheers! Hope your build for your friend goes well, and that we might see it up here sometime :-)

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

How do you like the mobo?

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

I think it is good.

B360 and H370 boards quickly become over-priced, compared to budget Z370 boards, making them bad deals, in my view.

Anyway, about this specific board, it is the cheapest one with four memory slots, at least some VRM cooling, and two m.2 slots (one the full PCIe x4).

Solid board, I reckon :-)