Description

Case: I fell in love with this lil mini-itx case (Thermaltake V1 Core) when I saw it's chambered layout and huge airflow.

CPU: For this I used the Ryzen 5 2600 as a budget option. A six-core processor with 12 threads for less than $200 in a case where I wasn't really concerned about overclocking...it fit the bill. And with the new Ryzen coming soon, I could easily recycle it into another build.

MOBO: The Asus ROG Strix X470-I was actually not originally what I was looking for, as it can be heavily overclocked and I didn't anticipate any overclocking with such a small form factor. Amazon being Amazon however, it was the only one in stock at the time and was Prime so it was a no-brainer. As an added plus with Zen 3 around the corner, I thought it'd be a good candidate for years to come. I did, however, manage a stable overclock at 4.0Ghz on all cores.

RAM: Corsair Vengeance is just the best. It's low profile by default and at 3200 MHz, it's a bargain at the price.

HDD: These I had from previous computers, the Seagates coming from an old server from my job. The SSD was a holdover from an old PS4, and the 1TB HDD was from an old laptop. The Samsung 970 Evo, however, was my first choice for an operating system hdd as it's fast and really stealthy hidden under Asus RGB heatsink

GPU: Because I currently game on an old Sony 50" TV (insert eye-roll here for all you 1440p+ fans), the RX580 8gb MSI MII Armor OC was the best bang for the buck at the time of the build. A GTX 1660 would've been my first choice, but when I built this thing, it hadn't even been rumored to release yet to my knowledge. A warning about GPU's of this length going into this case. The card can fit, but the 8-pin VGA cables have to be flexed to fit under the ridge of the frame. This can lead to MOBO bending as you fit the card into the PCI-E slot if you're not careful. Proceed with caution.

PSU: EVGA 750W Modular Power Supply fit the bill nicely as I had originally thought the Thermaltake could only handle SFF power supplies. Whipser quiet and suitable for my power needs for now.

CPU Cooler Upgrades: Originally, I used the Wraith Spire that came with the Ryzen 2600, and it suited my needs for a time. 63-70C under load. Not the worst, but not the best either. But when I heard about the possibility of a new Ryzen chip with 8-12 cores Boosting to 5.0Ghz, I figured a little future-proofing was in order. The stock 200mm fan that comes in the Thermaltake is great, but it's noisy. It's way noiser when you touch it as its spinning and shear off two the blades. A happy replacement was the Noctua 200 PWM Fan. It's whisper quiet and moves just as much if not more air. The Kraken X42 was a pure splurge, but to make it even better, I attempted a push pull system between the 200 Noctua and a new 120mm Noctua NF-A12X25 PWM. I hadn't seen it done before with Krakens, let along a 140mm AIO.

However, there's room to spare for everything, making a tidy watercooled high airflow push pull mini-itx system that punches way above its weight class. 4.0GHZ overclock on all cores, and with the right perforated side panel moved to the top of the cube, it has better airflow for the GPU. Currently, I have both low-noise adapters attached to the 200mm & 120mm Noctua Fans. I'm going to try removing them to see if I can get better temps, as the noise they produce is manageable.

Summary:

I can't say enough good things about this Thermaltake Case and all the mini-itx goodness you can stuff inside without it looking like its stuffed. I've got another one just for extra parts and now I'm tempted to make an ultra small form Micro server for all my media using a similar layout. Maybe even recycle a few HDD, the CPU, and an old GPU just for kicks

Updates 5-1-19

I chucked a couple of WD Easystore 8tb HDD's to replace the 3tb Seagates. I had to overcome the 3.3V pin problem that these drives sometimes have, but it wasn't anything YouTube and Kapton tape couldn't fix. Now I have 16tb of local storage. I added a 240GB Kingston SSD as a scratch disk to complement the Sandisk 240gb SSD. So all in all, not bad for under 200 bucks of an upgrade. I also removed the low noise adapters and I got a 4 degree drop in temps as a result. Moving the side panel to the front for GPU ventilation also proved helpful as that dropped a full 5 degrees. Looking forward to see what Zen 3 has to offer, and maybe AMD will be competitive in GPU's soon too.

Comments

  • 2 months ago
  • 6 points

I am fairly new to PC building myself, so I would like somebody to confirm what I am about to say. In picture 4, which shows a side view of your motherboard, your Mobo is warped because something has been tightened too much. Whether that would be the result of one of your mobo mounting screws with standoffs or the CPU cooler. I would like someone else to confirm this concern.

  • 2 months ago
  • 4 points

Oof, that does look bent. Maybe there is a missing/incorrectly installed standoff, or else the shear weight of the GPU on that particular point?

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

That stand off looks kinda high

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Confirmed, the stand-offs are really weird in that case ...

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

It is the aftermath of the GPU. It's the VGA cable that stressed the motherboard. But Asus makes some resilient tech. After I flexed the cable a bit, it straightened right out.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

More likely the wraith cooler for the cpu, it places quite a bit of tension if overtightened and looks as if perhaps the gpu was installed with a bit of force, but as long as the board is operating no problem. You should see some mini itx boards with those mammoth heatsinks on them then you'll see some flex.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

he said in the description that the motherboard might bend from trying to fit some cables so I think that's the aftermath of it.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Scale picture pls?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Banana?

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

How's a 2 liter of Dew work?

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

that works

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I am conflicted on this one. I guess money wasn't an issue given the high end fans, mobo, and kraken. They are undeniably good part choices, but I think similar performace could be had for around $700 especially if overclocking isn't probable for this machine.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I was conflicted too. Parts wise, all my CPU options at the time we're limited, so I went and for performance to price. I knew I wanted mini-itx and this case so I think those two initial decisions kinda put me down this path. The Noctua was a reaction to breaking the stock fan

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Pretty rad build you have here. I'm loving that case.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Thanks

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Got a couple of mini itx boards to play with might try this case. Yours looks like a box of snakes. I mean that in a good way! Really! (none poison types).

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Yeah I agree

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I thought there were only two drive spaces for the Core V1. Are there more, or did you just stick your SSD in the middle of your cables or something (lol)? Nice build, though, +1

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

It has 2 combo slots each with a 3.5 and a 2.5 HDD caddy for a total of four possible HDD's. I've got an SSD and a 1tb 2.5 HDD in the them currently, but I might replace all of the HDD with SSD in the future for less noise and more performance :)

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

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