Description

This is the latest addition to my private machine park. Back when I’ve bought the mainboard and CPU a few months ago, I had planned to build in a smaller case. I couldn’t get hold of the HW Labs radiators that I wanted for it and while looking for alternatives I fell in love with Watercool’s HTSF2 LTX radiators. They are quite thick (50mm+terminal ports) and a few millimeters wider than the competition. I’ve checked quite a few case data sheets and the radiator width seemed to be a real issue with some cases. I then stumbled across Corsair’s Obsidian 1000D which has more than enough space for water cooling.

During the build process I’ve learned of the restrictions that Corsair’s flagship case brings construction wise. I had to mount the 2 front radiators (2x Watercool HTSF2 LTX 360mm) with terminals towards bottom because they where obscured by my 420mm top radiator (HW Labs Black Ice Nemesis 420GTS). There also was a pretty close call when it came to connect furthest back front radiator terminal. It was pure luck that I was able to reach it with a combination of an angled 90° adapter, an angled 45°, an extension and another angled 45° adapter followed by a fitting. This construction goes from the radiator through one of the nearby cable routing holes. The top radiator has 3 Noctua fans in pull config because I had forgotten to buy some short M4 screws in order to mount the radiator directly to the mounting bracket. Should the need arise, there is still enough space to go for push/pull later on. In the front there are 8 Corsair LL120 fans of which 6 are used as radiator fans in push config. The remaining two front fans are just for added ventilation. Connecting and routing the RGB cables coming from the fans quickly turned into rat’s nest, because the cables coming from the furthest away fans are just long enough to connect them to an RGB fan hub while the closer ones pile up. It would be nice if there were extensions available, because I am not exactly happy with the cable routing and position where I had to place the RGB fan hubs and second Commander Pro unit.

As for the other cooling components I’ve decided to go with a Watercool HeatKiller 4 sTR4 CPU water block, Phanteks Glacier GTX 1080/1070 for MSI Gaming series GPU water block, Watercool HEATKILLER Tube 150 (real glass tube) with multiport support and D5 pump with Watercool pump top. The 16/10mm fittings, angled adapters, drain valve and temp sensor plug are all from Barrow. There is also an in-line temp sensor from Phobya. The tubing is black EPDM tube (16/10mm) and I use EKWB’s new Cryofuel Azure solid as coolant. The fans are controlled by two Corsair Commander Pro units and their fan curve is based on coolant temperature readings.

After setting up everything up and installing Windows 10 it turned out that most of the USB ports where in a state of surge/over current protection and therefore disabled. By some weird coincidence I had plugged my mouse, keyboard and installer USB drive into working slots…

After draining the loop and using an old Enermax sTR4 AIO and GPU from my HTPC system I was back to breadboarding. The error remained, and in the end, I was able to resolve the issue by simply reseating the CPU (on modern AMD CPUs, USB3.1 gen1 controllers are integrated into the CPU).

After putting everything back into case I’ve encountered a different hurdle which was caused by Microsoft’s automatic driver installer enforcing the new DCH (universal) driver system. This in turn caused the regular driver downloaded from nvidia’s website to report an incompatible Windows 10 version and me to believe that my PCI Riser is to blame. Until later that day (and another coolant drain to mount my GPU without riser) I did not even know that such a thing exists. A few days later I’ve drained the loop for a third time and restored the vertical GPU setup. The System is now up and running and I’ve had my fair share of troubleshooting and coolant puddles.

Comments

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Huge. +1

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Those are a lot of fans.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

ABSOLUTE UNIT

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Do you prefer the look of the black tubing or is there another reason it was chosen? Curious because I think some clear tubing would give it some nice blue highlights.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I was sceptical at first, but I like how it turned out. I chose EPDM (rubber) tubing over PVC soft tubing because it doesn't doesn't contain plasticizer. Plasticizer slowly gets disolved into the cooling fluid and over time small blobs of it can get stuck in the water blocks.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Did you have any trouble running the ram @ 3200 with the xmp profile? I seem to have trouble on mine.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi, I've encountered some instabilites during high memory load at 3200MHz. Although my CL14 RAM Kit comes with the praised Samsung B-DIE RAM chips, I currently run them at 2933Mhz@1.375V (I've turned on XMP in the BIOS and then manually changed clock speed and voltage). I've also updated the BIOS to the latest version, but so far I haven't felt like testing the new BIOS version and settings at 3200MHz.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Do you know if you’d be able to fit two ek D5 Pumps next to each other on the res cutouts on the back panel

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't think so. Have a look at the 15th photo in my build, there is a rubber grommet to the left of my pump. You might however be able to mount the second pump to the front most radiator by using a pump mounting bracket.