Description

The Ordinary Ryzen Build transplanted into a small form factor.

Most components remain the same except the mobo and the PSU, which makes this build looks pretty last-gen, but it's still powerful.

In spite of its cheap looking, the motherboard works well. After all the bios updates now it's pretty stable and can boot faster than my previous MSI board. It's bios is not as user friendly as the MSI's or ASUS's boards, but the functions it provide is mostly the same. With a little tweaking the rams can run at 3200mHz on it without a problem.

The PSU's build quality is nice even compared to my previous titanium one. The included wires, though, are still stiff, which makes the cable management even harder in this tiny build.

The most important thing: Ncase M1 case. I had always been wondering whether it's worthy to speed $200 on a case, but now after using this build for half a year, I have to say this case is the best part of this build and deserves its price tag. For the first time I find that a desktop PC can just take the space of a laptop, and the desk suddenly become broader and cleaner. Although it's not as small as the A4-SFX from Dan case which can fit into a bag for a short trip, it still has the portability that means a lot to me: when I leave my college for home with my desktop, I no longer need to carry a gigantic paper box with a trolley: a 16 inch underseat spinner would fit this case well. The case's thermal performance is also better than my expectation: although the CPU cooler suffers a huge downgrade compared to the previous build, the CPU temp won't pass 60C after 15 minutes of stress test. The GPU temp reached the maximum of 77C after 15 minutes of stress test, which is acceptable as well. In my opinion, this case has reached a balanced point between portability and thermal performance, which seems just perfect for me.

The design of this case is remarkable too. The components are compact but well organized. Apart from the support for full size GPU, this case can even fit two 3.5' HDDs, and all other SFF cases I know seem only accepting 2.5' drives. This became the final reason for me to choose it, since I don't want to give up my 2TB hard drive. The external panels can be removed toollessly, but the hard drive rack requires a screw driver to remove, which is a little bit disappointing, but I guess there's hardly a better way. Although the holes on the panels seem defenseless, the included filter actually prevents most dusts from getting inside and can be cleaned easily.

An slot-load ODD or an 2.5' drive can be fit under the front panel. I chose the ODD because of my CD collection.

As for the dual screen setup, the 24' screen is my old monitor, and the 27UK600 has the same panel as the 27UK650 and 27UK850. Their differences are basically the better stand for 27UK650 and the USB type-c port for 27UK850. Therefore, 27UK600 becomes the most cost effective choice for someone who uses monitor arms and doesn't use type-c ports like me. Amazonbasics' monitor arm is perfect except that its pole is too low for me to use the monitor while standing, so I bought the WALI one, which has an high pole, and combined the two arms together. If you don't have the need like mine and want to buy an monitor arm, go for the Amazonbasics one, compared to which the WALI one is not even close.

Comments

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice M1.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you :)

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I've wondered about the M1, if I were doing an SFF build I'd consider it. What are noise levels like, idle and stressed?

Nice looking build!

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

According to my experiences, the idle noise is barely noticeable, and the noise would still be acceptable even if the CPU is stressed. Only when the GPU is stressed will it start to make me feel loud.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey, I'm considering purchasing this motherboard and corsair lpx 3000 ram, and was a little bit worried that the two wouldn't be compatible. I noticed that you got those two working together, and I was just wondering what "tweaking" did you do? Was it as easy as enabling XMP or something along the lines of playing with voltages and timings? Thanks!

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Actually by just putting these two parts together and enabling the XMP it should be able to run at 3200MHz, but I'm a little bit unsure here, because I used to meet some BSOD problems related to memory management occasionally. At first I tried to limit the maximum memory to 15GB in windows, and the symptom was relieved a lot. Later I tried to adjust the timing in BIOS according to the configurations others shared about this same memory, and it seemed that everything magically worked out: I never see a ram related BSOD anymore when running them at 3200MHz, and I don't need to limit the maximum memory. I still don't know whether it's a flaw of my rams or a compatibility issue that caused those BSODs before.