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Comments (Continued)

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point
  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Probably going to want to keep researching.... you know how these things go ;)

Consider the Ubiquiti EdgeRouter 4 instead of the XR700 router functionality. This is about $200

Consider deploying a number of UniFi AC Lite Access Points throughout the space (presumably large if you need 100 ft long cables?). These are around $90 new, and about $50 used (lots of used available out there from business leftovers). A lower bandwidth mesh network with great coverage everywhere is better than a high bandwidth single hotspot that only works well for nearby devices.

Consider either building your own NAS or re-purposing an old rack mount server. You'll probably get more for your money and can put a 10Gb card in there (or it may come with one). Check out refurbished Dell Poweredge R420/520/720 series on Newegg Marketplace. You can get a very powerful old server for only a few hundred bucks. Use FreeNAS or something similar with a decently well developed virtual machine / docker capability to run a ubiquity unify controller from for your mesh network management. (there are lots of guides out there for this).

There are also lots of guides out there to running a unify controller from Synology and QNAP NAS devices as a docker app. Some googling suggests this can also be done from a Asustor NAS as well. Either way, if you're planning to spin up a "NAS" solution anyway, then you're already going to have a 24/7 operating machine on your network that can serve more purposes than just data storage. This is a great place to host mesh network management from.

Consider a Netgear XS508M switch instead of the GS808E. 8 ports of 10G to play with internally between wired machines and the NAS. Having a lot of 10G ports is expensive. This is about a $500 chunk.

Consider a Netgear GS310TP to provide POE to access points, and basic 1G ports for other devices. ~$140.

My conceptualization for running Fiber in my thoughts above, was more as a "lay it and leave it for later" approach. Stick to CAT6A for now to connect devices, but consider running the fiber options as they may be useful in the figure. Use "10GBaseT" network cards for now.

Other Thoughts:

Network gear that is all dressed up in "gaming" related marketing **** is likely over-priced for what it is.. Case in point, the S8000 vs GS110MX. Same number of the same type of ports. The "gaming" version comes with a $50 "ooh shiny" tax.

10GTek and FS are very cheap but pretty good 3rd party alternatives for the money. I've used transceivers and DAC's from them with no issues. They are "honestish" chinese ripoff operations that aren't trying to counterfeit, but rather, make their own name as a cheap alternative to the name brand.

NIC's that seem too good to be true, might be counterfeit. My hunch here is that a $35 10G card, whether it claims to be a refurb, or a pull, or whatever, is more likely a counterfeit card. Many of these do function, but be aware of the risks that come with counterfeits (possible security issues, more likely to fail young, possibly incomplete feature-sets, etc).

Aquantia NIC's don't have the performance of traditional options from mellanox/intel/broadcom/etc. Cheap for a reason. Not a really "complete" or full performing 10G implementation, but that may still be acceptable.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok how is this for now? I went and dropped the Fiber idea for now.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/bYGxGc

Just to let you know I don't live in a house I am in a Apartment,the reason I wanted 100ft cable is cause my living room is the only place that has the cable for the internet going in to the modem. My place is 800 Square Feet so the living is kinda far from my bedroom. The Switches,Access Point,Modem,Router,NAS will be in the living room and my computer will be in my bed room. By the way I do already have a wireless Router do I still need the Router you recommended?

Oh one more thing the reason I was going to get that Wireless router at first is cause the one I have now is kinda dated and I just wanted a new Wireless Router.

Could you recommend a Wireless Access Point that I can plug in to the wall,I can't put anything on the ceiling. I can put something on the wall ill just need a outlet near by.

I thought building my own NAS but I thought about the OS then,I like Asustor's OS on there NAS and it looks easy to understand.

I thought about doing a server but I'm scared to get Used/refurb stuff.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

It should be not private now,wish it would stop doing that lol.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

you can get used enterprise grade switch for cheaper.. seeing atm(due to house itself) i am using a 48 port 1gb switch. got it for like 25 bucks. this apply to 10gb also in terms of vastly cheaper.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]
  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi James,

Sorry I made an assumption there that would over-complicate things for an apartment size application. 1-2 AP's will be fine. Doesn't need to be a commercial mesh type thing.

That $300 access point you have in this latest list is overkill... Designed for high density commercial applications like coffee shops, restaurants, entertainment venues, where people are expected to really "pack in." It's designed to service up to ~300 connected devices. No doubt, it would work really well for an apartment. If you're thinking about only having 1 access point, this would work but be more complicated to manage than necessary for a small space.


Router/Wifi:

An "old" wireless router doesn't necessarily need to be replaced unless it is a performance bottleneck or security risk. Do you have blazing fast internet that is being slowed down by the router? Does the manufacture of your wireless router still release security updates for it? (new firmware?)... Does it only support an old/slow wireless standard? Do you have a ton of wifi connected devices causing the wifi performance to choke? Does the wifi not reach the far end of the apartment? Any of these things could be a good reason to replace it.

800sq ft sounds like a 2 bedroom. If your apartment is arranged out in a "square," (~26 X 30), use a single good wifi access point/router combo. If your apartment is arranged in a long rectangle (~16 X 50), get a easy-setup 2-hot-spot wifi system.

My advise for an apartment that is "square" in shape, would be to pick up the Ubiquity Amplifi HD router/wifi box. That's $150. If you have a rectangle shaped apartment, pick up the Ubiquity Amplifi instant "2-pack" kit, that comes with a router and 1 additional base. That's $180. The little wifi "bases" are clean looking boxes you can put on an entertainment center or night stand or whatever. This system only needs power to the additional boxes, no Ethernet (it uses a separate wireless connection between bases).

Links:

https://www.amazon.com/AmpliFi-Ubiquiti-Seamless-Wireless-Extenders/dp/B07HHHC8JB/

https://www.amazon.com/AmpliFi-Router/dp/B07YNX7WJN/

Doesn't have to be unify, but they have made a big name for themselves in wireless for a reason. Expect reasonably long-term security update support and a reliable product that delivers strong wifi signal.


Switches:

Here's an interesting switch:

https://www.amazon.com/QNAP-QSW-308S-Switch-Gigabit-Unmanaged/dp/B07VC9RTR9/

Gives you 3 X 10G SFP+ ports at each switch. Buy 2-3 of these. Connect each bedroom switch to the living room switch with fiber (probably just use multi-mode or short-run single mode transcivers, since they are cheap). Might be able to connect the NAS to the living room switch with a direct-attach "twinax" SFP+ cable. Might also be able to connect your computer to the switch with a DAC cable as well.

Just connect the router to a 1G port.

FS can build custom DAC's to connect different brands. Might be worth reaching out to them to have the custom cables made, or just buy transceivers for both sides of the equation. Might also be worth asking them which transceiver "types" are likely to work with the QNAP switch. In this case, it would be much cheaper to go fiber because the transceivers are only ~$20-25 for MM or short range SM fiber, compared to ~$65 for an Ethernet transceiver.


10G SFP+ cards:

I think with the switches up for consideration above (SFP+)... it's worth returning to your original "refurb" NIC ideas there...

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017O9VPYY

Problem is.... you can buy 4 of these for less money than a single "genuine/new" card. After some reading around, some of these really cheap "refurb" 10G cards are in fact, legitimate pulls from datacenters. They are just older versions of the 10G cards. You can have spares on hand... For home use, screw it, I'd take the chance on these. About the least expensive genuine, new, 10G card you'll find that's a proper mellanox/intel/broadcom controller, is ~$150+ for a single port. Sketchier ones from 10GTek and FS.com (which have an Intel chip but may not be very genuine otherwise), are still $110 new.

I also like the mellanox approach as I think they adhere to the open SFP+ port standards, so you might have good luck getting a DAC working from the switch to computers using generic DAC cables.

https://www.fs.com/c/generic-10g-sfp-dac-3412

Check with FS though, they can probably advise on what tranciever encoding the QNAP switch might need.


NAS:

Not sure how much you want to spend here, but I think if I were spending $1000 I would expect one with a lot more drive bays than 4....

There are some on amazon I'm seeing for under $1000 with SSD cache bays.. Lots of options around $700 that look nice enough. I'm not sure what other workloads you have in mind for this device, but something with an Intel "core" CPU for quicksync might be helpful if you're looking for a video transcoding solution to be included.


Drives....

Consider starting with 2 X 8TB drives instead of 4 X 4. Gives you upgrade headroom and the cost per TB isn't much different. Heck... 12TB drives are not bad for cost per TB either.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

No need to be sorry you didn't know,I should of told you in the first place.

My Router is this https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KWHMR6G?tag=pcpapi-20&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1 My internet is 50mbit down 5mbit up.

I don't mind about the AP I know its over kill. I did look it over and I do like all the stuff you can do with it. Just wish it would say how many feet it covers hopefully that covers 800 square feet but for what ya said it's mainly used for it does sound like it would. Plus I don't mind how difficult it might be I like tinkering with that kind of stuff and learning.

The router you picked in the first round does that have a firewall built in if not I found some firewalls I could add to the Network even some come with cloud key really not sure what cloud key does.

My place is only one bedroom kinda strange for how big this place is lol. Its not square or a rectangle its sorta hard to explain. I drew a pic,don't laugh lol,I am not a artist lol,I tried to visualize it in my head; https://ibb.co/pf74LZx

What I plan to do with the NAS is OS backups,File Backups,Game Backups,Pictures etc. I may want to host a file server,forum,website. maybe a game server if possible. I would like to have my own Cloud too. I do have wireless Security cameras I could use to record stuff on to the NAS.

Yea for $1000 I was hoping for more than 4 drive bays I am still deciding. Between Ausutor,QNAP and Synology they all have nice NAS its hard to find one that has like 10 bays and a lot of features and be fast. One of the NAS I looked at has the Ryzen 1700 CPU with 64gig ram in it but you probably could imagine how expensive it was lol.

I have been looking at these to be honest;

QNAP 12 Bay NAS/iSCSI IP-SAN

QNAP TVS-951X-2G-US

QNAP TVS-682-i3-8G-US 6 Bay

QNAP TS-963X-2G-US 5

This one here is insane price wise lol;

QNAP TS-1685-D1531-128GR-US Bay High-Capacity 10GbE iSCSI NAS

All the NAS's do come with the option to expand the bays but rather just get one with a lot of bays instead.

Some are expensive,I have a bad habit looking at reviews and some have bad reviews and scares me away,don't want to spend all that money and have it fail after a year. I'm trying to find one that has a lot of bays,a lot of features and is fast,and doesn't require me to buy add ins like the 10G cards or a graphic card etc.

I am assuming the small bays are for SSD and those help with read and write speeds?

I forgot to add something the reason I went with managed stuff for the switches etc. is so I can play with the software something to learn :) I like fiddling with stuff like that,that's other reason with the AP I picked,I really like all the graphical graphs etc. it has.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

No need to be sorry you didn't know,I should of told you in the first place.

No prob.

My Router is this https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KWHMR6G?tag=pcpapi-20&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1 My internet is 50mbit down 5mbit up.

That's a pretty decent home router/wifi device. As a router/firewall, I don't see any reason to replace it for a 50/5 connection.

The only reason to replace something like that, would be if the wifi isn't reaching through the apartment, or if you wanted to get into something more sophisticated like running a pfsense firewall for application layer packet inspection, etc.

I don't mind about the AP I know its over kill. I did look it over and I do like all the stuff you can do with it. Just wish it would say how many feet it covers hopefully that covers 800 square feet but for what ya said it's mainly used for it does sound like it would.

Ubiquity doesn't really rate range on their commercial stuff, because they understand that there is no rating they could give that would be applicable to a broad range of customers. Everyone has different material and RF environments to contend with that can dramatically change the useful range of an access point. Everyone has different devices with different WiFI performance that will dramatically impact useful range as well.

Looking at the drawing of your apartment, it is more like the 16 X 50 shape I talked about. If you access point is on the far living room wall, I could see that having a hard time reaching across the entire apartment.

A "mesh" configuration of 2 hotspots would work better for that layout if you're trying to get wifi to the kitchen more reliably. Alternatively, if your WiFi was separate of your router, then you could install it in your bedroom instead, which would centrally locate it, which should eliminate the need for more AP's.

Plus I don't mind how difficult it might be I like tinkering with that kind of stuff and learning.

I wonder if you might enjoy setting up and using a pfsense firewall. You can run pfsense on lots of commodity hardware. There are inexpensive little fanless computers on amazon sold specifically as "firewall appliance" computers. They come with numerous ethernet ports, and usually low power atom type CPU's. If you're interested I can make suggestions....

The router you picked in the first round does that have a firewall built in if not I found some firewalls I could add to the Network even some come with cloud key really not sure what cloud key does.

A firewall is a router configured to block inbound connections. Yes, the ubiquity router/wifi units I was suggesting are also a "firewall."

Though, if you're concerned about whether the firewall is "good enough," consider setting up a pfsense firewall instead. It gives you access to "firewall" tools that are FAR more sophisticated than you'll get from a typical plug-n-play consumer firewall. Most people would consider it too complicated, and for home use, that's a reasonable opinion since it's rare for home networks to be targeted.

What I plan to do with the NAS is OS backups,File Backups,Game Backups,Pictures etc.

Really no reason to do OS backups unless you're talking about taking snapshots of server systems running in a virtual enviroment or something for the sake of maximizing business continuity for a commercial setup. Backup important files, software can be reinstalled easily enough.

I may want to host a file server,forum,website. maybe a game server if possible.

That means forwarding incoming requests to a computer inside the network. This is where some security engineering is worth some effort. Do you really want the outside world to be able to establish connections to machines inside your personal/home network?

With every convenience comes a security compromise.

Personally I would not host any of those sorts of services from a machine on the same network as my "home" network. Many people do, but I wouldn't.

This is where a more sophisticated router (like a pfsense box) might come in handy. You could create a "trusted" network, and an "burner" network. Use the trusted network as a place to run your personal computers and devices on. Put a totally separate computer on the burner network to host servers from, so that it is isolated from the rest of your stuff. On the "burner," host whatever servers you intend to run as VM's and do periodic snapshots so that you can roll back if they are compromised.

I would like to have my own Cloud too. I do have wireless Security cameras I could use to record stuff on to the NAS.

Here again, I would not put a NAS to work for both personal storage and a "cloud" hosting device. Access your personal stuff through a VPN. Host public stuff from a different spoke of the network.

I understand a lot of these "NAS" solutions claim to be "every server in a box" solutions, but if you deploy them as such, you're placing a LOT of trust in the security isolation within a single system. It would be wise to assume that it's your responsibility to separate functions into trusted and untrusted zones.

Remember, your 5Mbps upstream will be your downstream when you're elsewhere. Sometimes paying for a cloud service is better. Spinning up a VM on amazon/azure/google is not very expensive. Lots of cloud based storage solutions to consider.

Yea for $1000 I was hoping for more than 4 drive bays I am still deciding. Between Ausutor,QNAP and Synology they all have nice NAS its hard to find one that has like 10 bays and a lot of features and be fast. One of the NAS I looked at has the Ryzen 1700 CPU with 64gig ram in it but you probably could imagine how expensive it was lol....

Some are expensive,I have a bad habit looking at reviews and some have bad reviews and scares me away,don't want to spend all that money and have it fail after a year. I'm trying to find one that has a lot of bays,a lot of features and is fast,and doesn't require me to buy add ins like the 10G cards or a graphic card etc.

I am assuming the small bays are for SSD and those help with read and write speeds?

Some of them do implement the SSD's as "cache" drives, so that writes go faster and frequently accessed reads also go faster. It's a good idea, though personally, I would rather have a dedicated fast and slow pool of data used for different things.

I forgot to add something the reason I went with managed stuff for the switches etc. is so I can play with the software something to learn :) I like fiddling with stuff like that,that's other reason with the AP I picked,I really like all the graphical graphs etc. it has.

That's reasonable. Also, if you wanted to host a separate untrusted network, it might be useful to isolate it internally with VLAN control.

The graphical stuff that you can "See" using commercial ubiquity gear, is all hosted by the unify software that you'll have to spin up on a server system. That's not running on the AP itself. An important distinction.... You don't have to buy the $300 access point to get that. You can buy a $50 (used) unify access point and get the same software control.

On that subject... if you don't want a wall/ceiling mount unit, but really want the unify commercial solution, the UniFi FlexHD access point is worth a look. A PAIR would be nice for your long apartment if one is placed on each end. Otherwise, place a single in the bedroom.

[comment deleted]
  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

drawing of my place updated;

https://ibb.co/9pQnMm5

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