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Is VRM heat sinks important when not overclocking ?

MKensei

14 months ago

I wanted to start a Ryzen 3 2200G build paired with a B450 motherboard, but from reviews I got the B450 boards (especially mATX) doesn't get much love. Doing research is extra hard when everyone is overclocking for someone like me who wouldn't bother doing so, couldn't get an answer that doesn't involve overclocking.

For mATX, I wanted to pair the Ryzen 3 with MSI B450M Mortar but someone suggested to get an ATX board that has heat sink both on its side and top VRM.

For ATX, the suggested board was MSI B450 Tomahawk and yes I think it is better than the Mortar but I plan to go with a mATX build.

My question is, if I run the Ryzen 3 2200G with the B450M Mortar at stock, should I worry about the VRM temps ? Also, if I were to use a CPU instead of an APU for example Ryzen 5 2600 (with GTX 1060), would this board still run perfectly normal without having to worry about anything ? Again, no overclocking whatsoever.

Comments

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

VRM temps are important mostly under load. check this video

Apparently Asrock and MSI have the coolest mobos, but Gigabyte mobos have less power consumption under load

This is the reason why I bought the B450M Mortar for my Ryzen 2600 mATX build. The Gigabyte VRMs are just...SCARY. The difference can be anything from 15C to 38C. if you don't want to check the video, this is what I saw:

Ryzen 7 2700 STOCK

Tomahawk: 52c under load, 120mm fan

Gigabyte Aorus Pro: 67c under load, 120mm fan

Ryzen 7 2700 @4.2Ghz

Tomahawk: 60c under load, 120mm fan

Gigabyte Aorus Pro: 98c under load, 120mm fan

Unfortunately, there is no stock Ryzen 2600 test, so I can't compare it with the overclocked 2600 test. But it's fair to say that, the less powerful the processor, the less heat it generates. Even if you're only running a Ryzen 3 APU, I'd rather be safer than sorry. And who knows? at any time you might want to overclock to get some extra juice out of an aging processor, and you don't want your MOBO to fail or burn because of crappy VRMS

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for replying, checked the video and it helped clarify that the Tomahawk is a decent board.

But I think you misunderstood the point that I was making, pardon me if I'm wrong on this but I would like to make things clear.

Like I said I'm looking for a B450 motherboard and the B450M Mortar was recommended to me, but then that person recommended me the B450 Tomahawk. I like these boards but I want to know if the B450M is as good as the B450 Tomahawk, since you even bought one. I know the B450 Tomahawk is perfectly fine, but it is an ATX board and I want to know if the B450M Mortar is decent as well since both of them have heat sink on their Vcore (side VRM) but only the B450 Tomahawk comes with heat sink for the Vsoc (top VRM). To simplify, here :

  1. B450 Tomahawk is an amazing board for ATX size, is the B450M Mortar a decent board for mATX size ?

  2. Will the B450M Mortar handle the Ryzen 3 2200G on stock (since APU pushes more power) without problems ?

  3. Will the B450M Mortar handle the Ryzen 5 2600 on stock (it has more cores) without problems ?

  4. Since you brought up overclocking, is it safe to mildly overclock on both the Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2600 on this board ?

You can just answer yes or no, and since you bought one and have the 2600 chip, it would be a huge help to hear from you.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Unfortunately, I’d be lying if I said yes. I bought the board but I can’t build my pc yet since my stuff is in another country and it will be another month before I build it.

the Mortar is the most expensive micro atx B450 board for the second gen Ryzens listed on this website, so I’ll be damned of it isn’t a good board.

I read something about the B350 tomahawk having the same heatsink as the B450 tomahawk, So something similar can be expected of the mortar. So yes, this board will handle these CPUS without problem.

I’ve read negative reviews about MSI’s “crappy BIOS” but not bad reviews about the quality of their boards.

if you really want a mATX build, I’d just buy it. It’s probably the best investment you can make right now since there are no X470 mATX boards yet.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I read something about the B350 tomahawk having the same heatsink as the B450 tomahawk, So something similar can be expected of the mortar.

They're actually pretty similar, some minor differences that I could find is that the B450M has 2 M.2 slots on board, it supports more memory modules speeds and it has a flash bios. Stuff like that.

...I’ll be damned of it isn’t a good board.

I'm confident now that it is a good board, some guy even said that this board can handle 2700X without overclocking very well so that's a relief. At least now I have an option between B450 Tomahawk for ATX and definitely B450M Mortar for mATX.

I’ve read negative reviews about MSI’s “crappy BIOS”...

I saw these too, but don't really understand what's meant by a 'bad bios'. Could you explain ? Is it bad as in affecting performance or just bad UI ?

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

The 2200G isnt a demanding CPU and not going for a beefy VRM on an expensive motherboard isnt warranted. However, if you can get one with some minimal VRM heatsink to help cool the power phases, itll help your motherboard run cooler. Also it will let you upgrade later down the road to a better CPU without the need to change the motherboard to properly support additional cores.

Something like the ASRock B450M Pro 4 would be just fine here as it has some heatsinks covering all the power phases without breaking the bank and should be fine with a 4-6 cores CPU down the road as well.

On a side note, I assume you picked the 2200G for the included graphics unit? If so, you will want to OC the CPU to greatly improve the included graphics processor and having fast enough RAM inample supply will also help your PC as well.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

However, if you can get one with some minimal VRM heatsink to help cool the power phases, itll help your motherboard run cooler.

But, the B450M Mortar comes with good heat sink doesn't it ? Or is it not good ?

Something like the ASRock B450M Pro 4 would be just fine here as it has some heatsinks covering all the power phases...

I've read lots of reviews about ASRock's motherboards being poor in quality. Even though they include heat sinks, they're usually worse or functions the same as boards that doesn't come with it. Bullzoid made a video about B450 and some B470 boards, Gigabyte and ASUS have the worse VRMs (I think) and the worst heat sinks. I may be wrong and this certainly doesn't apply to all, but when it happens it happens.

On a side note, I assume you picked the 2200G for the included graphics unit? If so, you will want to OC the CPU to greatly improve the included graphics processor and having fast enough RAM inample supply will also help your PC as well.

I did, and I still don't want to overclock. That's why I'm considering the Ryzen 3 1200 for 4 cores, Ryzen 5 2600 for 6 cores and Ryzen 7 1700 for 8. I might change my budget entirely and perhaps change the components as well.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

The Pro4 has kindof finned VRM heatsinks which should be fine. ASRock are actually really good in terms of price vs performance in the low end. All the negative comments I saw were related to people trying to use the board with super fast RAM 3000+ which is never a guarantee when it comes to Ryzen CPUs. Even with B dies, theres always a chance you might need to lower your RAM's speed.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

So, what would your recommendation be ? Say, I don't want to use the ASRock as my first option.

Would the MSI B450M Mortar be good enough for, Ryzen 3 1300, Ryzen 5 2600 and Ryzen 7 1700 ? Since that is the only motherboard for mATX that I think has decent quality with good VRM and heat sinks. For ATX I think the B450 Tomahawk is really really good.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

The Mortar is definitely a nice board.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the feedback !

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