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Most suitable DDR4 that is not a teenager's dream.

Quanto_Costa

15 months ago

Here is the parts list. I am wondering about RAM and am interested if there's any that is not overpriced and does not suffer from teenage Gameritis where it is covered in 'cool' excrescences and designs. I understand DDR4-3000 is most suitable for the Ryzen 2600. I am looking for 16GB in two modules. Thank you.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor £149.98 @ Ebuyer
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 I AORUS PRO WIFI Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard £117.01 @ CCL Computers
Storage Crucial - MX500 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive £71.94 @ Aria PC
Storage Seagate - BarraCuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £29.39 @ Aria PC
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 950 2GB Video Card -
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £368.32
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-10-05 16:41 BST+0100

Comments

  • 15 months ago
  • 3 points

G.Skill's NT Series are very low-profile and most people get easy OCs up to 2933MHz with them, probably more if you loosen timings a tad.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/qLkj4D,FNprxr/

Here are a couple of sets that are pretty basic.

Right in that price range G.Skill also has this kit of 3200, it's red, but not overly flashy.

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Nqp323/gskill-memory-f43200c16d16gvrb

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Finding the same thing in the UK, it seems the dollar prices and the pound prices are the same these days!

[comment deleted]
  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

I just want to point out that Ryzen based chips do not have a RAM profile to run DDR4 RAM modules at 3000 speed, you will likely have to manually set the speed to 2933 instead.

As such, you can acquire 2933 RAM modules or 3200 if you want to use your RAM to its fullest. The 3200 speed modules suggested by m52nickerson above should be fine here.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

The memory manufacturers have product lines that aren't marketed to gamers. Get any of those.

  • Micron's Crucial-branded memory
  • Kingston Value RAM
  • Any Samsung-branded Samsung memory
  • OEM-branded memory, e.g. Dell (may be overpriced, though)

Or any server memory. ECC UDIMMs (unbuffered, not registered) are compatible with Ryzen; not sure whether they're compatible with your motherboard. I know ASRock motherboards support it.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you for all the help. I am writing this on the rebuilt PC and everything seems to be working. Now to tweak Windows 10 and make sure my CAD profiles have copied across...

Oh, and I bought some Crucial DDR4-2400 in the end from eBay. It's doing the business!

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

A functioning computer is always better than the alternative. :-)

If you have time to play with it, I wonder if you would be able to push the speed to 2666 or maybe even higher...

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

3200 mzh will have a noticable impact on proformance

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you. Most helpful. As regards the 3200 idea, is that compatible with the motherboard, or do I have to do something with the memory bus first?

The specification reads: "DDR4 3200(O.C.)/ 2933/ 2667/ 2400/ 2133"

Is 2933 rationalised as 3000 or should I be looking at others, if I decide 3200 is not suitable for me?

edit: it looks like I was writing this just as Chillsabre made their point! So that specification above does mean something and the extra 67MHz are a problem?

  • 15 months ago
  • 3 points

Ryzen is really weird when it comes to memory. 2933MHz is fine, 3200MHz is fine, but 3000 is iffy on Ryzen builds.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you - a good catch! Who'dathunkit?

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

No problem!

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

I think the JEDEC standard goes in increments of 266.6666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666 MHz, so DDR4-3000 isn't actually a standard RAM speed.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

They really make it easy, don't they!

Now I'm looking at various studies that say higher speed DDR4 really makes very little difference outside synthetic benchmarks, but when I'm looking at quite a bit of money between 2133 and 3200 for two 8GB modules, is it worth it as alxttt suggests above?

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

It really depends on your workload. Some workloads (maybe graphics?) absolutely are bandwidth-constrained and will see improvements. https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=ryzen-ddr4-bios&num=4 and similar articles have benchmarks; notice Darktable's improvement. Heavily threaded workloads may also benefit due to faster Infinity Fabric.

In my case, I wanted ECC RAM, and the fastest available is 2666 MHz (without overclocking). I'm planning on trying overclocking it at some point.

However, based on the benchmarks I've seen, for most workloads I expect the benefit to be small; buying more RAM capacity, if possible with your CPU/motherboard, is usually more efficient.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you for that link. It appears I'm looking at fractions of a second for most applications, so it's not worth the extra cost for me at the moment. I'm not spending long enough doing repetitive tasks that would add up to a significant difference over the day.

Is it reasonable to say ECC is not beneficial for the average user, and is really for specific, critical applications?

I have an 8GB single module at the moment (and previously was on 4GB DDR2) so I think the main benefit I'll notice is from 16GB dual channel DDR4!

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

If you're dealing with Ryzen, there's only a small handful of motherboards that claim to operate ECC memory with error checking, and the Asrock Taichi is the only one I am personally aware of. (there may be others, I don't know.) Most Ryzen mobos which accept ECC memory at all will run it without error checking.

I'm not a big fan of random uncorrected errors, but having said that, I'm running my own workstation without ECC at the moment and I can't say I've seen any serious issues. For a gaming and general home use computer, ECC probably isn't needed.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Opinions differ as to how important ECC is, ranging from "get ECC if you care about your data" (the consensus among ZFS enthusiasts) to "it could help but it's not necessary" (e.g. https://blog.codinghorror.com/to-ecc-or-not-to-ecc/).

I lean towards ECC, because I expect people don't notice errors and thus underestimate their frequency. The main issue with non-ECC RAM is that if you have a bad stick, it could be corrupting your data and you probably won't notice. For the same reasons, I recommend using a checksumming filesystem; people that think, "I don't worry about silent data corruption since it hasn't happened to me!", might just not have noticed.

That said, whether to buy ECC will depend on what you use your computer for. At one extreme, if you're using it purely for content consumption (e.g. watching videos, casual gaming), then you lose no data even in the worst case, so there would be no point buying ECC. If you're storing your life's work on the computer, I'd get ECC RAM.

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