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Why overclock CPU for Gaming

FancySnancy

2 months ago

I always see a buncha builds with liquid cooling on the CPU, doesn't the GPU do most of the work when your gaming????

Comments

  • 2 months ago
  • 4 points

Well, there's plenty of games that can stress the cpu to the point that it may start to stutter or people that play competitively (high refresh rate with low settings) so the cpu may become the bottleneck.

Overclocking may help them achieve better frame times(better frame times= less input delay=better chance of you winning) and less stuttering on the games they're playing.

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

I just installed a liquid cooler yesterday and did an oc from 3.2 to 4.0ghz and i've diffidently noticed a difference. Specially when I am rendering videos, as for video games itself, it has improved a little but nothing ground breaking. Free performance is always nice. Plus its fun to see how far you can push your chips within reason.

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Not if the game is running mostly on one or two cores. Iracing was a perfect example of this when I played especially when using vr. To maintain that 90fps needed all the grunt my cpu had to offer. Doesn't necessarily mean you need liquid cooling though. My 4690k oc to 4.4ghz stayed around 60 degrees with a cooler master 212.

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah, as far as games go, the GPU is doing a lot of heavy lifting. But games can be pretty CPU intensive too so CPU does have an affect on performance as a result, sometimes more than other times.. And it's not like the CPU doesn't matter, it's a major component in the system. A really bad GPU or a really bad CPU can mean the game runs poorly, or not at all. They're both fairly important parts. You throw in a 10 year old CPU with a modern GPU and there's going to be measurable performance penalties in most games. And if you throw a bit more CPU power at a system (via overclocking) there can be some performance benefits.

Really overclocking has become so simple, and so accessible that people kind of seem to feel like it's a necessity, that you're short-changing yourself by not doing this simple easy thing. The fact that performance gains through overclocking are pretty modest at best doesn't seem to factor into whether we're doing it because we can or because it brings real value.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

doesn't the GPU do most of the work when your gaming????

GPU determines what quality settings you can use at a given resolution and frame rate.

CPU determines performance.

If you don't have the CPU performance it doesn't matter how much graphics performance you add you will not gain frame rates.

And even these days there are titles where overclocking is beneficial even with moderate expectations.

Indeed patch 8.1, Tides of Vengeance, has substantially improved performance for those gaming at 1080p, particularly on Ryzen processors. AMD reports that you can see anywhere up to a 35% improvement in frame rates at 1080p at lvl10 image quality settings, when using DX12 in the latest patch.

Pre-patch, AMD recorded an average frame rate of 43.2 fps with a Ryzen 5 2500X, and 42.7 fps with the Ryzen 7 2700X, those figures increasing up to 58.1 fps, and 58.2 fps respectively after the patch. The test system included 16GB of DDR4 3200 MT/s, a GeForce GTX 1080, and a Samsung 850 Evo SSD, all running off of a Windows 10 x64 bit install.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-ryzen-wow-patch-performance,38586.html

Mind you that is a title most consider can be played on a potato PC but those are average frame rates and a lot of the frames are going to be delivered slower then those figures.

Even if you merely want to see 60fps frame rates overclocking is going to help so long as you get higher speeds then stick, and many of that genre copy that titles game engine style and see similar performance gains over stock speeds.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

k, also Tides of Vengeance doesn't appear to be that optimized 43 FPS with a GTX 1080 D:

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Read above again if you are dealing with a CPU limiting you it doesn't matter what card you are using since the CPU is what is limiting you.

The new patch allows for more multi threading and they were able to with the same GPU bring average performance up to the upper 50's.

Although CPU optimizations typically don’t affect those playing at 4K, in our testing, taking advantage of a Ryzen 7 2700X, 32GB of DDR4, and a GTX 1080 Ti, we saw frame rates increase from 33fps, to 41 fps as well (roughly a 24% increase), when running around the capital city of Boralus.

In Toms testing which was at 4k and should have been GPU limited.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Well it also depends, major hub cities are pretty demanding, hundreds of people in line of sight all wearing who knows what armor and effects. You can easily get double the FPS somewhere out in the boonies. Ten years ago have shadow detail at max @ 1080p with a fairly high end system in Dalaran could put you in the 40's.

Or in large raids where bosses and 25 players are all slinging spells and abilities with who knows what effects, it could be fairly demanding too.

Ten years of graphic and effects updates, plus quadrupling the resolution is bound to be demanding even if it seems like the game shouldn't be. And you're not going to be playing the Witcher 3 (or any graphically superior game) at 4K with 80 NPCs on screen at once with a huge variety of models between them and get better performance. Most games just aren't doing anything on the scale that MMO's are, that's part of the optimization that's your imagining, designing the game so there's not too much going on at once. Little bit harder to manage that in a MMO.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

great answer. nice.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

As a general rule of thumb CPU speeds decide the FPS you will get without bottleneck and GPU decides resolution you can get without bottleneck. A 2080 Ti and i3 8100 will hardly be able to do 1080p 100 hz, however a 9900k and 1050 Ti would never be able to do 4k 60. Maybe swap the 1050 Ti for 1070 and both of those builds could easily push the opposite monitor.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

The "Rule of Thumb" is almost right you have to consider quality settings and title in there as well.

A 2080 Ti and i3 8100 will hardly be able to do 1080p 100 hz,

There have been quite a few titles where that isn't true lately (Overwatch, PUBG, Fortnite, APEX).

however a 9900k and 1050 Ti would never be able to do 4k 60.

And that really depends on how low you turn the settings.

Now those examples don't apply to every case but every case doesn't apply to every users desired performance in their use case either.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

However esports titles are highly optimized for higher FPS. It’s more of s general rule of thumb.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Giving how hard PUBG and APEX are on graphics I would call them optimized.

With the recent trend of AAA development tanking the "General" isn't what it used to be.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Really we are all just waiting for game engines to scale with multiple cores.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Isn't going to happen easily within current silicon or programming.

The more cores the higher the latency and the scheduling penalty.

Two of those titles above tried (PUBG and Overwatch) only to drop multi-threading because it created optimization issues.

And the two latest titles that multi-threaded well (AC.O and BFV) have turned out to be multi-threaded messes that even the highest end CPU struggle with frame rates in.

It ends up a balancing act between performance gain and what you lose for adding more threads.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

both CPU and GPU will generate heat when gaming........especially at 4K gaming........then you generate heat in a case

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