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what's the easiest simplest way to find out what's the hardware parts in this w10 computer? and what could be updated/upgraded and couldnt?

parts101

7 months ago

  1. what's the easiest simplest way to find out what's the hardware parts in this w10 computer?
  2. and what could be updated/upgraded and couldnt?

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

For me I just use the direct x diagnostic tool most of the time. But something like HWInfo is OK too.

Well if it's a prebuilt that would really depend on the model and OEM and what your upgrade plans are.... in theory everything is upgradable, but there may be some practical issues that are unknown because you neglected to provide some pretty basic information.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

someone say 'speccy' is good & simplest

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok. There are 3 methods I use. 1. About Your PC. Go to Settings>System>About. Or you can type About in the start menu 2. DirectX Diagnostic Tool. search dxdiag in the Start Menu. 3. System Information. Search System Information in start menu.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

does 'about your pc' actually tell you the hardware? it tells me basically no details when i tried it

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

CPU and RAM. Also, forgot to put this in before, but you can also use the BIOS

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

what os do you have...

it doesnt tell me the speed or latency or brand or anything about the ram https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/314723-cpu-done-ram-pick-16-64-ram

or any of the other hardware

[comment deleted]
  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

I often try to ID the motherboard model/number. Especially on oem systems like dell/etc with the mobo model you can look up all the specs of max memory and cpu for upgrades. Usually it will be the largest printed thing on the mobo. It is very important you know exactly what an old PC will take because some have odd configurations. The software (cpu-z/etc) will tell you what is in there right now. I just did a dell PC. However with these oem PCs you have to watch price on refurbs, sometimes you can buy a better refurb like a i3/i5 and be better off when you are talking upgrades on older low cost PCs. The dell I did is just for browsing type uses, a used C2Q was $16 and mem was cheap. With a SSD that was not so cheap it is a far better machine, but I can take the SSD out when done with it. With this PC for example it will not take the newer C2Q cpu only the older ones, this is common you have to be careful you don't buy the wrong parts.

[comment deleted]
  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

heard ccleaner was a no good company?

[comment deleted]
  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

isnt it owned by ccleaner it seems? they put bad stuff inside the software?

[comment deleted]
  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

k i dl that

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