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How much to sell a 6700k and z170 board for

Randomizer23

1 month ago

Hey guys I have a i7-6700K and a asus Z170-a motherboard I wanted to sell it as a combo on kijiji but I don't know how much to sell it for... Can you guys tell me how much would be a good price? Please put it in Canadian dollars thanks!

Comments

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Uhh thanks for the replies lol can I get a straight answer from one of you? and just sto say ive never overclocked on this board or cpu

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Sorry Randomizer,

Sell it for as much as you can.

I think it's worth $250 tops (though it would depend on the specific motherboard. Some folks think it's worth more, no harm in trying to sell for more.

I think you're more likely to get a great price for your 6700K sold individually rather than with the Z170. That's where the demand+ignorance is likely combining to push prices up on these.

Lots of people out there regretting their i5-6500's now in a world of 6-8 core's being standard desktop fair. The 6700K/7700K are the best upgrade options to carry those builds through another year or 2. They already have a motherboard, so your motherboard has no value to those many buyers.

Anyone in the market for BOTH a CPU and MOBO, Is better served to buy a new CPU and MOBO anyway. Buying motherboards used is always a crap-shoot and people know it.

The "debate" going on here in the noise is how to evaluate the value of used computer parts and what CPU would be a good reference to use as a basis for valuation of the 6700K/Z170.

I like the approach of figuring out what "new" CPU would be roughly similar to get a starting point for the value of a CPU. "IforgotMy" thinks a reasonable CPU/mobo to make this comparison with is a 3600. Considering the 3600 offers up to 75% higher execution throughput and double the I/O, I would not use this as a CPU of choice to get a baseline "what if this were new" value for a 6700K. It's in a different league.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

List, $275 square. Price just low enough to tempt someone away from watching while he/she thinks about it. Price just high enough you pocket a nip under going rate if you sold each component individually. Split the combo, board and CPU separately if this does not move within a month. Drop to around $250 after a couple of weeks if folks pockets are being stingy. You will for sure sell it.

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[comment deleted]
  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

An i5-9400 is closer to the performance offered by a 6700K than a 3600.

A B365 offers similar IO/feature-set to a Z170. I don't think it's reasonable to use X570 as the basis for "valuing" a Z170 board without an additional depreciation factor for the generational differences in I/O.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-9400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $239.75 @ shopRBC
Motherboard ASRock B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $142.06 @ Vuugo
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $381.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-18 23:39 EDT-0400

30-40% depreciation for being used....

~$250.

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  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

I'm not forgetting about overclocking potential.

The fact that the Z170 and 6700K could be overclocked, reduces their value even further because they may have been.

The 6700K is a poor overclocker. 10-15% isn't trouncing anything.

50% more cores beats hyperthreading by 25% at equal clocks, 6700K can't be overclocked enough to close the gap.

A 6C/6T arrangement is better than 4C/8T, as more execution throughput can be achieved across fewer threads, so the performance scales better for games and other real-time worklaods on the 9400. Less software optimization required for performance uplift across threads.

Using the 9400/B365 as a basis for comparison is more than generous.

[comment deleted]
  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

There's no good reason for anyone to be paying those price and no good reason for anyone to be asking those prices.

A broken market full of ignorance on both sides of the equation should not be encouraged.

Don't forget, there's also the 9400F for like $140 that offers 6700K performance for even less money to any buyer who doesn't need the iGPU. Even more reason the 6700K shouldn't be worth what people are paying for it.

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  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

In my comparison example, I wanted to match or exceed the performance of the 6700K as closely as possible in all regards.

The 9400, at within 2% according to your link, is a far closer match than a 3600.

Anyway, OCing a CPU doesn't really reduce its value unless...

Unless the market says so. If I'm in the market for a used CPU, I would factor in heavier depreciation for any CPU and Motherboard that were overclocked or likely to have been overclocked.

You can choose to consider this a devaluing effect or not, but personally, I think you'd be crazy not to.

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