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Are large SSD disks worth it?

Coursair
  • 6 months ago

I recently realized that SSD prices dropped hard, and I can get 1TB SSD for ~$100. That raises the question - is it worth it to get one? I am used to configuration: small SSD for system and 1TB HDD for data. Is it recommended to have one huge disk for everything (partitioned ofc)? Or it will be better to stick to good old 240GB SSD+1TB HDD?

Comments

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Faster storage is always great to have.

Hard Disks are really only good now for major amounts of storage that doesn't need to be fast and you can sit around waiting for.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

And is it recommended to have one disk for everything, or is it better to have two physically separate ones, one for system and other for data?

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Depends on specific setup and platform.

If it is a single Sata drive you can experience slight slow downs if everything is on the same drive because of bandwidth limitations.

If your looking at a single large PCIe drive that bandwidth sharing is a moot point.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Do you mean motherboard, processor or something else?

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Both. AMD and Intel have their own unique qwerks and what is supported and at what levels.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

MOBO: B450M DS3H CPU: Ryzen 5 2600

Targeted SSD: Crucial P1 1TB M.2 NVMe

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Depends by how much data you are storing. As you said a 1TB SSD can be had ~$100 these days and if that is all the storage you need then why not? For HDDs you can get them for 12+TB these days for mass bulk storage where SSD is not practical for that much.

[comment deleted]
  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

The "small, fast SSD & big, slow HDD" set-up dates back to the introduction of SSD, when they were very expensive.

The current equivalent would be "NVMe SSD & SATA SSD", but the difference in cost and performance (for most users) between the two isn't as stark as it was with SSD vs HDD.

So unless you're a) really strapped for cash, b) trying to incorporate existing storage or c) plan on reinstalling your OS often, there's no reason not to have one drive (to rule them all). And I don't think there's any need to partition it either (I'm ready to be shot-down on this though).

Two things to bear in mind, are that smaller SSD (sub-1TB) perform somewhat worse than larger ones and similarly, as they fill up (say, over 75% of capacity) they slow down.

It's unlikely most users would notice; either way, in all but the most extreme cases they'll still be faster than HDD

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Okay, so what will be best port to connect storage with? NVMe or SATA?

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

with NVMe pricing so close to SATA it's hard to recommend SATA unless on a real tight budget. NVMe you will need a m.2 compatible slot which i'm not sure if you have. (or get a pcie adapter).

Post your part build so we can see what will work.

Essentially SATA drives can be either 2.5" or m.2. Basically the same just depends where it plugs in. The sata SSD will top out around 500MB/s speeds due to the limitations of SATA. This is where NVMe comes in with a different interface and you will find drives in the 2000 to 3000 MB/s ranges etc. In normal use you won't notice a difference though but do to current pricing, it makes sense to go with NVMe if possible.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

So everything is built on top of B450M DS3H motherboard, which does have M.2 port, as the specification states. I have option to buy Crucial P1 1TB drive for ~$110, is it worth it? EDIT: I am getting lost, because on website it's name is M.2 PCIe NVMe P1 SSD... So, into which port will it go eventually?

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

The M.2 slots on most modern boards use the PCIe lanes unless there’s a SATA drive in them. The point of the PCIe in the name is to clarify it is, in fact, a PCIe drive as opposed to SATA.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Maybe to clarify a bit might help. When you read about m.2 and 2.5" drives that is the form factor (Physical product type). The 2.5" is the laptop size format and the m.2 is the small computer chip that is about the size of a stick of gum. The 2.5" drive will always be SATA (SATA III for the current drives) and plug into a SATA port on the motherboard with the typical hard drive cable. The M.2 will be either SATA or NVMe and the chip itself will directly go into a slot on the motherboard. (NVMe uses the PCIe interface)

Your motherboard supports: Ultra-Fast PCIe Gen3 x4 M.2 with PCIe NVMe & SATA mode support

The Cruical P1 drive is: PCI-Express 3.0 x4 as well so will fit in fine.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

"small, fast SSD & big, slow HDD" hasn't changed at all, just how big "small and large" are. "Small" can be around 1TB, while the sky is the limit for "big". One popular source for hard drives is WD enclosures: expect 10TB for ~$160 to show up often in sales (they are currently ~$200 at newegg), buying 5 2TB SSDs would typically cost over $1000.

On the other hand, plenty of people find that they don't need that type of storage, often relying for things to remain online. In this case you simply keep the small drive and don't bother with the "big" one. This is pretty much the way to go for "normal people", although I suspect that anyone bothering to come to this website is an extreme outlier of computer buyer.

[comment deleted]
  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

I think 1 TB of SSD is better than the old method. It’s nearly the same price at this point and you only lose 250 GB of storage.

2 TB is the point of diminishing return for SSDs and if you need that much, I’d still recommend a 1 TB SSD + 2 TB HDD (or more). The more programs on the SSD the better.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

A larger SSD is always the better option now, unless you really need mutliple TB's-worth of local storage space, because for one thing, both the DRAM & SLC cache on SSDs directly scale with their size in most cases.

[comment deleted]

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