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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best external DAC option for gaming and music"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I am putting together an older Haswell system from ebay parts, mixed in with some new hardware. This is kind of a sleeper project I guess as I'll be using a Compaq desktop case from around the 2004 era...that pc came originally with some kind of low end celeron 2ghz.

New build... Xeon X3-1245 v3 H81M-C/CSM board AMD RX570 8gb GPU 16gb DDR3 kit Noctua low profile cooler OS= Solus Linux or some other Linux

The GPU takes up darn near three spaces which I wasn't prepared for. For testing I put a quad port nic in the smaller pci-e port and it will mount but it's a very very close to the gpu.

My issue with sound that was unanticipated...there is no optical/toslink port on the motherboard...it's a no frills board apparently. So I'm looking at sound cards but concerned about clearance. I thought about getting one of those pci-e extenders but I don't think that's going to fly in my case as the only other port would have a old pci slot...I think an extender would only work if there were a blank hole to mover over to...basically I would need a case with at least one more slot.

I am probably going to try to put a ASUS XONAR SE 5.1 in there and just deal with the tight clearance issue. Looks like there may be some external options but not real sure how they fly with Linux...the Xonoar supposedly is well supported.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows is expensive"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Just go with Gnu/Linux

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Linux for PLEX server, older hardware?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Plex or Emby are the two to look at for this purpose. Kodi may also offer a similar purpose.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bootable USB"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok you have two options if I'm following what you are asking. You can't just willy nilly copy files over to the new drive and expect it to work if that's what you were getting at.

Section 1:

  1. Do a fresh install via a DVD-rom or USB of Windows 10. Windows will find the drivers/firmware for your SSD no problem. Once you are done installing Windows should activate if you use the same microsoft account to tie it together.

  2. Option 2 is a bit tricky using cloning software. Sometimes the SSD manufacturer will offer a cloning program. If so that may be a bit more user friendly. Clonezilla is real good for power users...but also not overly friendly for noobs. Your SSD will need to be equal to or greater than the size of the hdd. Clonzilla acts as a "live os" that is booted from a usb iso. From there ideally it's best to have the new ssd where you want it and the old drive mounted via usb or esata or some other method. I always use a Sabrent usb3 to sata/ide hdd adapter.

Section 2:

Before beginning any of this...you'll probably want to backup your existing hard drive's files to another device (ext hdd) so that you can migrate what you want back onto the new install. Windows has built in programs for this and there are also many programs that come with an ext hdd.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "WIFI Adapter Not Connecting To Kali Linux"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Maybe try install kali-linux-wireless from the metapackages via hard wire

Also see if you can find firmware-atheros or ath9k_htc...possibly called something else in Kali or not in their repos.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "modest linux computer"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

I’ve not tried Zorin but many people on the forums love it. There are far lighter on resources distros but you prob need to get your feet wet before tackling most of them.

That computer should do fine for most general computing tasks.

Some of these distros can be a pain to set up via UEFI on modern hardware and certainly don’t play nice with Windows killing Linux partitions.

I haven’t had to really mess with that yet but my machines are all getting up in age. I’m waiting for the latest Ryzen releases to hit and then I’ll upgrade.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "modest linux computer"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

wifi nic's and usb dongles can work on linux...but do your research before buying as many will use chips that have limited functionality or not at all in lieu of no open source drivers. I'm not sure what to recommend...probably something from Intel. I think you want to stay away from Broadcomm chips.

https://www.slant.co/topics/2335/~best-pci-e-wifi-cards

Comment reply on Forum Topic "modest linux computer"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Most distros are fairly straight forward to install.

If you get off the beaten path you might have a bit of trouble with mount points, boot loaders, and UEFI

Also graphics cards can be a pain on some initial setups.

I suggest you set up virtual box as a hypervisor (with the host as Windows, Linux, BSD, or MAC) and then you can tinker around with many different ones without having to install on baremetal

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Computer help with linux"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

That’s a good starter system. I imagine it has pretty good steam/valve support.

In a lot of settings you can click on “Hardware drivers” and it will show you if the Nvidia drivers are installed. The open source Noveuo version runs pretty good. If you get choppy or screen tearing then go for the non-free Nvidia drivers.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How to migrate from old pc to new pc"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Clonezilla would be another tool to use for cloning...maybe not as user friendly though as some.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will Windows XP be able to be installed on this build"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Unless the purpose is for gaming which then takes you into the QEMU+libvirt+lookingglass with pci pass through rabbit hole.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "BSOD on Windows 10 install for brand new custom system"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Just some random suggestions:

.....At this point...to give some piece of mind I would download a live version of Linux. Slax Linux would be excellent for this because it's designed to only be ran from a usb stick. You don't have to be impressed by it or even know what you are looking at as long as it boots. Just download it, use a program to make a bootable usb. Rufus or Unetbootin are a couple options for making a bootable usb. If it doesn't boot up then it would further prove a hardware issue. If it does it would lean more toward a bad copy of windows 10 or some other configuration issue. It probably also has a memtest feature you can use I'd imagine.

I assume you haven't played with the ram settings in the BIOS? It might just be a matter of that board and that RAM not playing nice.

maybe reseat the cpu/heatsink and new gel.

It sounds like you ruled out the graphics card by trying the integrated graphics. When installing Windows I would only have the boot drive hooked up as I've seen Windows get confused and crash with multiple hard disks during a fresh install.

Make sure the m.2 doesn't conflict with some other pci-e or sata.

USB flash drive in the upper left port in the back of the pc is usually the goto for any quirky stuff but surely OEMs have fixed this.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Moving over my SSD to new computer"

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Slightly off topic but I was trading out an SSD in my desktop the other day and throwing it in a friends aging laptop. To my surprise it booted right up and installed a few drivers. No issues but this was a inactivated copy of 10 pro.

I toyed around with it for a while and didn’t see any performance issues but decided to download the correct version for her laptop as she had 7 Home 64 bit. I installed 10 Home 64 bit and gave the 7 OEM key and it took it just like back in the free upgrade days. I also installed a new kit of ram taking it to 8gb and this old i3 Toshiba runs like brand new money.

My desktop got a new 500gb SSD and a fresh install of Archlabs with i3-gaps...it’s days of windows are likely over other than maybe in a VM.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What is your favourite Linux distro?"

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

It’s a jenga puzzle but seems to work great when it’s up and running. Nothing seems to work the same way twice. :) I stay at it and finally figure out what the crap I typed wrong. It tells you what line it’s got a syntax problem with so I nano back in and CTL / (line number)....and that gets me in the ballpark.

There is a NixOS wiki “configuration collection” made up of real world users. I just found this and plan to sift through it and tweak my config files. Most of these are split up into several .nix files and imported into the main config which to someone that knows what they are doing...prob no problem but it gets pretty confusing. I want to stick with a basic configuration.nix

(VM to baremetal) but I’m not sure how to get there properly. I gather is more involved than what I thought but people use this OS for clustering and all manner of docker this and that...I’m sure there are fast/easy ways to deploy it based of the config templates. I think the part to overcome is the hardware configuration being different and it confusing the bootloader among other things

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What is your favourite Linux distro?"

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I treat these operating systems and/or computer builds as puzzles. It just happens to appeal to my other interests such as restoration or upcycling.

Generally the more of these gnu/linux's I install the more it becomes pretty clear that most of them are pretty darn similar. However...a lot of the "under the hood" stuff is way above my head. I do pick up things here and there that help me think critically. So if I get in trouble in the CLI a lot of times no matter the system I can figure out what I did and either fix it or at-least learn not to make the same mistake twice.

Back on point...

What did I like best out of those 4 you ask? I wanted to like Bunsenlabs and with time I'm sure I could learn to live in it. Their version of Openbox was really the part I liked the most. Light and minimal which really helped on old hardware. I guess it was more of a love hate thing as I ran into a few issues with not finding the packages that I wanted which led to me getting daring. Such as using Tox to install Qutebrowser. It worked fine but..yeah kinda weird. I had never even heard of tox before trying it. That didn't make it crash though...somehow it just ran out of disk way faster than it should have so i figure it got setup wrong from the jump. I was also using LVM with Luks which probably played a part.

.............................NIXOS...........................................

Today's adventure was to install NixOs.

Yes the Budgie trial run didn't last. After longer usage and the latest kernel update seemed to kill performance. I mean badly. I decided that just wasn't going to fly on that hardware though I will say I really liked the Budgie DE and will return to it on another machine.

NixOS and it's Nix package more specifically is going to be a bit of a bear to learn. After a few hours of pulling hair out I decided to keep pushing. I never imagined it would eat up a day of learning, reading, learning some more. Mass confusion. Anger. Joy. Then more anger. I basically reached a point where I had so much time invested in it that I hated to bail out. I was real close to pulling the plug. It was a good day for it though with the freezing rain outside.

This has been one of the more puzzling installs I've ever done and I'm not nearly done, but it's up and running and functional as I type this. This system is kinda neat with how it deals with packages and configs. I'll attempt to explain as best as I can...

From what I gather once you've created a system configuration...that same .nix file can basically be copied and setup on a new machine. This would be useful potentially with a few tweaks I could setup on a vm and do a lot of my experimenting and then take it over and put it on the real machine and commit to it. I'm sure the true benefits for this would be able to rapidly deploy. For my purposes of learning it without fear of borking the real system...that would save time.

So basically you have a config file that tells it how to boot, what services to run, network stuff, packages to install, what desktop you run, user info and what groups is the user to be added to and so much more. I mean it's different than what I've ever seen.

I think most of my issues are getting my bearings on the documentation which seems very much scattered. This OS seems to be a Swiss Army knife so I can imagine it would be pretty difficult to document especially for someone like me who is by no means classically trained in the art of Linux(ing) stuff.

A lot of the reviews on this basically say it's hard to install. There is no installer gui or otherwise. I used the Live Gui version to check it out and then went into the terminal to do my formatting and mounting. Honestly I'd say it's not hard to install. It's hard to understand. It threw me for a loop on a few things...mainly how to get the wifi working. I mean it's for advanced users and I have little business really messing with it but here I am. I now feel confident I can get it installed and booted up into a very basic barebones setup pretty quickly...writing a complex config file in nano or vim is the hard part (for me).

But how does it function?

It's early yet but this thing seems pretty ok. It may be my imagination but this thing flies on firefox now where as with other operating systems on the same machine it was pretty boggy making me want to go to Qutebrowser.

It's on KDE Plasma 5 DE and just seems to work without a hitch so far. No screen tearing. I don't have it loaded down with a bunch of stuff so I'm sure that has an impact. Really on this machine I don't need much more than a very minimal setup. I may end up looking at getting a wm of some sort setup but a stripped down KDE seems fine.

Just checked neofetch to see what kind of ram it was using with a bunch of tabs open. 1581mb...last night on Solus it was the same but barely functioning. Kernel may be the big difference there as Nix is on 4.14.86 vs the 4.19.XX that Solus was on last night.

Anyway...so I got on a long winded one. Sorry about that.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What is your favourite Linux distro?"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

My latest samplings..

--Bunsenlabs (I ran it for about a week and generally I don't dig these window manager setups...but this one was very easy to use based on openbox)...I only had a 20gb hard drive in it and it ran out of space and just crashed the entire thing. I've never had that happen so not sure if it crashed because of that or because I kept messing around in the CLI installing packages that Debian didn't have. I mean it's got a billion packages in stable...but nothing I wanted.

--Dragonfly BSD (not really meant to be much of a desktop and didn't manage to put it on real hardware. Wouldn't see the keyboard or mouse. I think I could have dinked with it long enough and got it going but nah too many other options to worry about it)....ended up doing a virtualbox installing xfce. I'm curious about the BSD stuff so I'm looking into it.

--Ghost BSD (same deal as above...the laptop I was trying to intall to didn't like it. from what I've seen in virtualbox i could live in it no problem. I've looked at TrueOS in the past and didn't care for it. OpenBSD and FreeBSD I've tried in virtual machines but never real hardware. I've not tried HardenedBSD or NetBSD)

--Solus Budgie (back to old reliable..I only installed it to look at Budgie as I never really have spent any time in it. I've always just used Mate with Solus. Seems to run on this old hardware better than I thought. Pentium Dual T3200 with 3gb ram)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What is your favourite Linux distro?"

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

If you looking to toy around I recommend HaikuOS...it's still in the beta phase but it's worth spinning up. This isn't based on the Linux kernal. It's an os based on the old BeOS. I've only tried it in a vm but plan on trying it on real hardware one of these days.

I've tinkered a lot with various forms of Linux in the last couple of years. Right now I'm on the community edition of Manjaro Deepin over the last few months. Works great on a old laptop with an SSD. Deepin is a very polished desktop which kind of takes the linux feel out of it. I found the repos of the actual Deepin OS to be slow and out dated packages so I opted for the Manjaro version.

On another computer I've got Solus Mate installed and another has Void Mate. The Solus machine serves as my home office and I can run virtualbox VMs for when I need to do something in Windows for work. The Void machine is a 10 yr old laptop that I just dink around with every now and then. Both of those run flawlessly over the last year or so, they are independent distros which doesn't mean much to me because I'm not overly educated on all things Linux or BSD. By coincidence both distros lost their lead the developers and have had some transitional woes but they are getting sorted.

Oh on a very old machine I've got Q4OS running which runs better than it did with Lubuntu on that particular hardware. Q4OS is surprisingly snappy and based on Debian stable. Has kind of a Windows 9x feel to it which some people dig. I don't think I'd run it as a daily driver but I guess that would depend on the use-case.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Still want to use Windows XP? worried about 4GB RAM limit? Try this"

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Have you tried any of the point of sale reg edits? Supposedly xp will continue to get updates as long as it thinks it's a ATM machine. Comforting.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A normal question"

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

It's annoying. Did it to me while watching a movie the other night. You would think with Windows spyware that it would know I was watching a movie and not to disturb me with a popup notification that I have to get up and click out of.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I know nothing.... need help"

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

RE: Windows (running w/o activation)..umm yeah

RE: Kodi. Yes it's based on Linux/gnu though it's not really intended as a desktop operating system. Actually I guess it's more of a program than it is a operating system. It can be installed on just about anything. Kodi was developed for the XBOX more or less as a hack program and has evolved into a legit system that can be used as a media server/streamer. It's basically only held back because it's open source code means it's open to repos that put bootleg a lot of movies and what not. These are generally unreliable now due to the crackdowns by the man. Variants of Kodi would be LibreElec or OpenElec which are minimal operating systems that basically only run Kodi.

Rasberry Pi (runs Raspbian) is not the same thing as Kodi by any means but it's another thing you might dive into at some point. These can be fun projects I understand...many people will build "RetroPies" and run retro games on them.

RE: what you should do?

Really there is no right answer here. I recommend going over to Reddit https://www.reddit.com/r/linux4noobs/ and reading and maybe asking some questions there. There are also a ton of youtube videos on how to install these various operating systems though be warned a lot of them are installing as virtual computers but the same process applies.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I know nothing.... need help"

  • 20 months ago
  • 2 points

It's really not that difficult especially if all you plan to do is general web browsing and light linux supported gaming. Most modern non-microsoft browsers are fully supported in Linux. If you use Firefox, Opera, Chrome...you are good to go. There are other examples of this where Windows users are already using open source programs such as Libreoffice or OpenOffice. There are so many really good Linux desktop operating systems now that all you have to do is install it and use it. The learning curve is not really that bad but with most things you get what you put into it.

There are certainly differences from Windows, but once you get used to how it works it's not that bad. I'd say the biggest leap is understanding where programs come from. Basically you have "package managers" and you install programs from "repositories" either via a software center or terminal (think command prompt). If it's not in the repo then it becomes a more advanced issue and much of the time means you probably aren't going to get it. To me Ubuntu is confusing with this and that's why I would recommend something trimmed down and maintained like Elementary or Solus. They put out only packages that are currently maintained and not a bunch of googly gook that's been in the repos for a dozen years that may or may not work with your kernel. When I first got serious about using Linux about a year ago I thought I had to do 90% of this from a terminal and with Solus basically a 100% can be done from their software center. It's neat learning the terminal stuff but I wouldn't let it be a deal breaker.

If you aren't sure what you want to do just keep in mind that Linux operating systems mostly all run on old hardware some better than others depending on the hardware. So if you have an older computer that you want to experiment with then it's a great way to get your feet wet before jumping in on newer hardware. Another option would be Virtualbox or VmWare, but that doesn't sound like something a beginner would want to dive into. With Virtualbox you could have a Windows host computer and then have virtual computers with whatever "guest" operating systems you want. BSD, Linux, other Windows copies. It's not really intended for heavy usage but it's a good way to learn if you figure you'll like an operating system and if you do it right you can use those fairly well just not much gaming/3d support. Again it's not a deep as it probably sounds, once you get the hang of it you'll be addicted to installing operating systems.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I know nothing.... need help"

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

Linux is a rabbit hole and I enjoy tinkering with things so it doesn't bother me to switch distros every now and then. To each their own though. Anything that says "LTS or stable" implies that it will have a longer support life than the most recent versions, but the trade-off is it doesn't get the bleeding edge kernels and package updates. Because there are so many variables it's difficult for any distribution to get it right 100% of the time whenever there are updates hence the reason for LTS. It's going to be running on rock solid testing and will update on a monolithic pace compared to distros that have a "rolling release" some of which can be updated possibly several times a day.

Some distros will simply give options for an "unstable" version which really doesn't mean it isn't stable it just means it's possibly less stable than the alternative. I takes a little while to digest all this.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need a Windows Alternative"

  • 20 months ago
  • 1 point

I use Solus and my understanding is it’s a great OS for Linux gaming. I’m not into gaming so wouldn’t know. It’s a rolling release and tends to be fairly bleeding edge which can be an issue, but I’ve used it since last Nov with only a couple hiccups. Debian stable or any number of Ubuntu is good starter.

Arch is something you can jump into later once you’ve got your feet wet.

For me a rolling release isn’t a bother especially considering all the security patches that have come out in the last few months. Solus has notifications for the updates and you would update programs at that same time. It’s so much slicker than anything else I’ve seen. I’ve always found Ubuntu is too easy to break mainly because of all the old programs that remain in their repos. Download the wrong thing or don’t download all the dependencies and it can turn into a pain.

Windows 10 is a great OS ruined by Microshaft. Really all they are doing is exactly what we allow Apple to get away with.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New PC build having issues installing Windows"

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Not an apples to apples comparison but i have a Athlon X2 245 and it runs 64-bit version of pfSense for my router. I've never tried to use it for Windows 10. My bet is it don't like that ram on that board for some reason. Maybe get down to 4gb and try the 64-bit Windows again and then if it makes it add back the ram and see what happens. Edit or just try with the one stick of 8gb ram.

Option 2: Get a lightweight linux distro. Search Lubuntu or Linux Lite. Download the iso and create a bootable usb. Fire it up in live version...this would basically prove if the computer is capable of booting.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New PC build having issues installing Windows"

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm spit-balling but are you using the 64-bit version of windows 10 or the 32-bit? I would think with the 32-bit version it wouldn't like 16gb of ram.

Also might want to look and see if your Bios is up to date...that might help.

https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/support/A68HM-E33-V2

Comment reply on Forum Topic "AMD E-300 APU"

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

So it's got 4gb DDR3 RAM in it with a 1.3ghz cpu? That seems odd to me especially being a desktop. I guess this could be one of those low watt AMD Sempron machines.

To make it faster...

  1. SSD storage if it's got sata...though it could be argued that it's a major waste of money if it's SATA I or II

  2. Go lightweight operating system (Linux)...something like Lubuntu (this will limit gaming but you would be limited anyway)

  3. Get mobo model number and google the manufacturer...find out what cpu/memory options are options and then go hunting for old stock/used parts for a machine that's...well updated.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 7 Coffee Lake"

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VTC4k6SLWY

This video addresses this issue. It may help.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 7 Coffee Lake"

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point
  1. No...that won’t work.

  2. To address compatibility: You can run a modern secure host OS such a Linux distribution (and use Virtualbox then load and use windows 7 (requires a good activation key)...can’t hurt to try your existing key first but it’s very unlikely they would let it fly.

  3. Virtualbox probably isn’t going to be great for gaming. You’ll also need “guest additions” and “extension pack” installed...it’s a learning curve.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "windows not downloading to usb?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Pirates. I would not waste your money

Comment reply on Forum Topic "windows not downloading to usb?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

It's been slow going at least while doing the Fall Creators Update. I've downloaded that thing 3 times in the past week over a slow dsl connection at my office. Oh man that was so slow...awful.

Not sure if it would matter, but you might try choosing to download the .iso file and avoid using the windows media creation tool. Typically at my house with a 50mbps service I can download Windows 10 in about 20-30 minutes.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/software-download/windows10ISO

Be sure to choose the correct version of Windows 10 that you purchased.

To create a bootable usb you can use a program called "Rufus". The program is very easy to use just download it and run it. You can also search "using rufus to create bootable usb windows 10" on youtube and it will give you several videos to watch in case you aren't sure how to proceed.

https://rufus.akeo.ie/

Disclaimer: I am not a paid spokesman nor offer this as the only method to install Windows 10. Using this method is not illegal and does not suggest a violation of Microsoft's terms of service. Any assertion to the contrary is a misrepresentation of what I have said above.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I? asap please..."

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Legally, yes

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can you change Oem to USB?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Either way. I didn't have to use the media creation tool the other day. Don't think it even gave me the option. I prefer to download the iso file and then create a bootable media.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can you change Oem to USB?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes. You can store it on another device

Go to Microsoft website and download your version of windows 10 via iso file. NOTE: it’s free to download not free to use

Download a program called Rufus. Run to create bootable media to the usb/sd card of your choosing

Boot up your new computer with the usb and go through setup.

Put in your activation OEM number when asked

Continue through installation letting it update as needed.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Speeding up an old ipad..?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I use my ipad2 as a nightlight in a bathroom.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Installing ZorinOS Dual-booted on an old PC"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

You might also look at Solus if Zorin doesn't work out. I've not tried Zorin to compare, but I find Solus to be very good and pretty easy to understand.

Personally I've not been a fan of Ubuntu offerings, but my primary experience was with Gnome 3 desktop which I just did not like at all. I hosed my Ubuntu Gnome 3 setup by playing around too much with the terminal, but since then I've come to find out that many have come before me in that regard.

I've done some jumping around and each time I learn a little bit more about the different offerings. Before Solus I was using Manjaro with XFCE and I liked it too but Solus Mate on the same hardware seems so much more polished.

Beyond that I would also recommend getting into VirtualBox and learning how to boot up virtual machines. I'm just now learning about all that stuff and it's pretty easy once you get the hang of it.

Don't know much on the Java stuff to help with that. Good luck.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 10 Sleep Issue"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

On two different Windows 10 computers today I've seen some weird deal where the computer randomly goes into sleep mode while it's being used and just comes back alive a second later. A quick blink off and back on again.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "If I make a full build and don’t buy a version of Windows or anything what happens.."

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

I would tell you but it would violate the TOS agreement that Microsoft has with everyone on the planet.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 10 USB?"

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

No I did not. That is no where in my post. I specifically implied that if the deal was too good it's not legit.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 10 USB?"

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

To do what?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 10 USB?"

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Search Windows Media Creation tool

Download iso file of the version of Windows you want.

Or download the usb version

It’s not illegal, it’s straight off the Microsoft website. How you acquire the key is where the legality comes into question. If it’s real real cheap it’s probably not legit.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NO INTEL PENTIUM 4 660 IN PCPARTPICKER? TOO OLD?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

What are you going to be using it for realistically? What operating system are you going to run it with? Why are you attached to this platform?

You will not find recently produced parts for that old of a processor. You can put together a system with new old stock and so forth...it's probably not going to be worth it beyond just wanting the experience of building off an old platform e.g. retro gaming machines.

Hard to speculate beyond that but perhaps if you are trying to squeeze some life out of an existing computer then...maybe look at going to an SSD. If not gaming then go to an SATA SSD and Linux...that P4 will do real good if it's got plenty of ram.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I want to verify if this is true"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

The first time I did an installation from usb it rebooted and went right back into the installation setup as if I had not ever tried installing before. I ended up yanking the usb and it booted into windows. After thinking about it I figured this was because I had changed the boot order to look for usb first.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What are your thoughts on Coffeelake not being backwards compatible with Z270 motherboards and Kaby Lake not being compatible with Z370 motherboards?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

It's not a secret. Though my confusion would be Canon Lake being a different deal altogether so I reckon this socket will be short lived? Edit: Ok Ice Lake...whatever.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A 32-bit/64-bit OS can run either one?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

What is the title asking?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I Change My 32 bit System to 64?"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard has drivers for Windows 7 64 bit and the cpu specs say it can do 64 bit. So I don't see why not. Windows 10 64 bit should work fine. You may need to think about doing a bios update to the latest before going forward: F10 release notes mention "enhanced memory capabilities"

You'll need the activation key and do a fresh install.

Probably would also need to add RAM because 64 bit will want more.

Throw an ssd in there as the boot drive and it should run like a top.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which version of Windows 10 is best for Gaming? Also, How to install to M.2 Drive?"

  • 26 months ago
  • 4 points
  1. The OS should be stable. BSOD would normally be due to poor installation, bad parts choices/configuration, or altering windows. Whomever is telling you that doesn't know what they are doing. Having the pro version will not prevent issues that may have become apparent with Home...Pro offers more enhanced data protections and networking. In real world use in the home it's not necesssary to have PRO.

  2. USB, you would plug it in to the left upper most USB port on the rear panel. You would have to go into the BIOS to select the USB to boot first. Save the BIOS SETTING AND exit...then it will boot the USB into windows 10 set up

2b. Updating the bios is not necessary unless you must update in order to use the CPU you choose and in that case you would need a compatible CPU to do the update. This need varies depending on hardware choice so it's kind of hard to answer...in general you should not have to update the bios.

  1. Follow the windows ten prompts and you should be ok. Installing windows ten is very easy. Once it reboots you want to remove the USB so that it doesn't just boot back into setup.

Put together a build list and someone can look it over and tell you if everything looks ok

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which version of Windows 10 is best for Gaming? Also, How to install to M.2 Drive?"

  • 26 months ago
  • 5 points
  1. The Home version is fine for gaming. As for "Best"...I'm not sure there would be any difference.

  2. usb version will install faster. i get the disc with the COA just to keep, but just do install via download and creation of usb bootable media. For a beginner the disc is probably less confusing option.

  3. Leave the hdd out until you've installed windows 10 onto the ssd, formatting/partition can be an issue. I've tried to install to ssd with another hard drive present and it gave me issues. Some quick searches led me to believe there are known issues with this...i cannot remember the details.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "average router/modem lifespan"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

I just retired one that was approx 15 years old, it seemed to die right after a big storm but it was also known to flake out and have to be restarted. It was a wired Network Everywhere Linksys being used as a switch. I had an extra Asus N16 wireless router that I ended up installing as an access point (turned off radio) so it basically only functions as a switch, assigned the switch a static ip preceding the assigned ip range from pfSense so that it would not conflict with anything. Seems to work pretty good.

To answer your question...I have no idea.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "May We Please Put in the New Athlon CPUs From AMD onto PCPP a Bit Faster?"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Is this in reference to the Athlon X4 lineup or the Athlon APUs?

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