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Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

You can actually make it fit, the mesh's support system are metal tabs you can actually loosen up a bit and re-bend quite easily, which gave me 1.5mm (or so) of clearance for the cooler.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually, I did not touch SOC_Voltage at all and left it stock. Might be an idea to play with it.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

You can pick another fan that is less thick. Although, what i did is simply loosen the tabs with which the side panel mesh is holding (those are metal parts that can be slightly bent), which allowed me to get the extra 1mm of clearance needed for the fan to fit perfectly. All I had to add was the rubber standoff on top of the ram to make sure the mesh would not wiggle back down given the tabs holding it in place where now looser, thus locking it in it's slightly (1mm) higher position quite securely.

All you need to know about SFF pc is: plan ahead, and plan your cable routing, otherwise you will have a mess of cables. It's the same principle as building a larger PC, but cable routing is the key to a good SFF build.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

You can actually fit a low-profile card (the half-bracket length ones) if you opt out of the included internal psu and opt for an external brick psu or a pico-psu. (this might require some modding though)

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Not too bad. Clearly audible under load though. Although, that's when I'm gaming on it. And any speaker or headphone will cover the sound of the single fan.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Front and lower fans: intakes. Top and rear fans (+GPU): exhausts.

So, I've got 1x120 ans 2x140mm intakes, and 1x120mm and 2x140mm exhausts, plus the gpu exhausting too. Overall, landing a slighlty negative pressure in the case, but, given the really good fan filters and the insane airflow in the case, next to no dust builds up in it.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you again I guess!

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

It has a single usb3 header that connects to the two usb3 ports.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Ran it, with the card at 120% power limit, +150 on the clock, +400 on memory. With all fans at 100%. The cpu was at 4.0GHz @1.3975V.

Furmark (alone) for 20 min (stressing the gpu) : 58-59 degrees average, got a peak of 61 degrees for 2 seconds, then stabilized to 58-59.

Prime95 (put on low priority, so furmark could run 100%, and prime would then max the cpu at 100%) + furmark for 20 min (stressing both the cpu and gpu): 62 degrees stable on the GPU, with a peak of 64 degrees for a about 20 seconds 3 or 4 minutes in the test. The CPU got at 57-59 degrees average, with a few peaks in the low 60s (61-62).

Those were the harshest conditions, running the hardest test bench (far beyond any real world usage) with both CPU and GPU OCed to the max, I only ran the tests for 20 minutes because I'm not into risking my hardware too much. Mind you, with normal fan curves, the temps would have been higher, but you asked for 100% fan speed, so here it is.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I'll try to remember once I get home. However, it's not the same lineup of cards, so the TDP output won't be the same, and the power limit on my card is 120% while I think it's 130% on yours. So, results will have to be taken with a grain of salt.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly, I don't know, I would have to try it out, but I never felt the need of 100% fan speed, even when stress testing my OC on furmark.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

We are talking about half the size of a Xbox.

Here it is next to a node 202, which is just a bit bigger than a xbox: https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3giiOGOysOE/maxresdefault.jpg

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

The fan on the gpu has a slightly more aggressive curve than the others: 0% below at 30 degrees, 0-40% at 40 degrees, 40-55% at 50 degrees, 55-70% at 60 degrees, 70-90% at 70 degrees, 95-100% at 75 degrees and up.

Running the gpu at full load does, in fact, slightly rise the temperatures by about 2 to 3 degrees on the GPU (versus a normal gaming load). However, even running a full GPU+ CPU stress test made the temperature get to insane levels.

Basically: it's perfectly manageable.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 13 months ago
  • 5 points

Cut the leg, boom, a few pounds lighter!

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, 3 builds in 2 weeks, posted on the same day.

Although, you are not on the build with the 2400G, I will answer your question: AAA games are hard to run on it. On low settings, expect about 30FPS at 1080p in games like Witcher 3. Although, If you play at 720p, it will happily sit around 60fps. Overclocking it can give a good 15%+ improvement in fps if you get a good chip.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

It fits with less than a mm to spare, but you can tweak the side mesh a little, and it gives a 3 mm clearance.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

It's sufficient for stock, light OC, or iGPU hard OC.

It can't support hard CPU + GPU OC.

In other words:

everything stock = fine.

CPU at 3.6GHz + iGPU at +100MHz oc to the iGPU's core speed = fine

stock CPU + 200MHz oc to the iGPU's core speed = fine

CPU at 4.0GHz + 200MHz oc to the iGPU's core speed = crashed while stressing

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Running them ranging from 20 to 80% (custom curve), so 400 to 1600 rpm. Although, they never even hit 1600rpm, given they never hit the temperature threshold to hit that part of the fan curve.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Looked at the front page for a while, seen a few build with 20+ upvotes got on there, mine got 40+ within the first day. Meh... No biggie, I just love showing my work. Thanks man.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Not loud at all, barely audible while idle (my monitor's little buzzing noise actually covers it, when my monitor slightly buzzes somehow), and, given I have my headset when I'm gaming, not audible at all.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

The mesh ain't thick enough to hinder the airflow, so airflow fans will do the trick.

I'm using a 2x140mm front, 2x140mm top, 1x120mm bottom, and 1x120mm rear config.

You can also pull a config with 3x120mm in the front instead of the 2x140mm.

The case does not support 140mm rear exhaust, unfortunately.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. Although, the 4670K is still a solid cpu.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, and good luck!

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My living room's 4K machine. AKA: the little devil.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

It's doing the job quite well actually. The mounting mechanism is quite simple.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

It's actually a 92mm fan. The case is small as hell.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 14 months ago
  • 4 points

It's actually a 92mm fan. The case is small as hell.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

I had read that the Gigabyte had problems at first, plus, I already had the Asrock Taichi, and I'm in love with their bios. Seriously, they did one hell of a job on all bios. And why not B450? because I did that build before the B450 came out (ordered the 2400G as soon as it camed out and flashed the B350 bios using a R5 1600).

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I had them from another fractal design case. To my luck, they had the exact same pattern, so perfect for my build.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 14 months ago
  • 3 points

I know, but I already had the spare A400, and, honestly, didn't feel like putting 100 more dollars for something I would barely notice.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

If you properly set your fan curves, or run them in silent settings: not at all. They are basically the same as any other Noctua fans, but with slightly more robust bearings to support up to 2000 or 3000 rpm.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 14 months ago
  • 5 points

I'll use a cringy, black and white, "impossible is nothing" desktop wallpaper. Close enough for the adidas sponsorship?

And thanks.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My living room's 4K machine. AKA: the little devil.

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

The 1080Ti is overkill if you are not running 4K. But if you are wait a bit after the new card release, you'll be able to snag a used 1080Ti from someone upgrading to a 2080Ti for very cheap, while still having several years of warranty..

Also: you can go way cheaper on the fans, Corsair ML Pro are top of the line stuff, and cost over two to three times what "average" fans do.

You can also get a cpu cooler that is not as fancy. If you get a Ryzen chips, just pick a model that comes with a cooler, they look nice and do the job pretty great for stock coolers.

You can also finally go cheap on the drives. Buy a standard 2.5" SSD and a 1TB HDD, you'll just have to reinstall games more often.

If you follow all those tips, you could save 2-300$ on the GPU, 75$ on the fans, 75-100$ on the cooler, and 200$ on the drives, for 550-625$ less than I did. Do also take a note that I'm a Canadian, so I do not know if my prices show up in your currency or mine.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: Keeping it classy. A black and white themed build.

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

They are IPC 67, so:

IP67 equipment is 100% protected against solid objects like dust and sand, and it has been tested to work for at least 30 minutes while under 15cm to 1m of water.

Comment reply on blackzaru's Completed Build: My SFF lan rig. Weighting in at less than 7lbs (3kg).

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

That motherboard has 2 wifi antennas, a Bluetooth device, and an ethernet port. So you can connect both wirelesly to your router or wired to your rooter/switch/modem. In no way does it connect to a cellular tower though.

Although, if you do want to connect a computer to a cellular tower, you can, but you need to purchase a dongle with a sim card, and either pay for data packets or sign a contract with a cellphone carrier for a data plan.

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add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube